SoCal PhotoExchange

Creating “Contact Sheets” Using Adobe Bridge and Photoshop

Posted in Photo techniques, Photography, Uncategorized by Gerhard Clausing on September 13, 2017

If you have wanted to create sheets that show sets of images in your folders or  series, in order to print them like the “contact sheets” from analog times, this is fairly easy to do. Reasons for doing so might be that you want to keep a printed visual record of what’s in your project folders or project collections, or you might want to document possible sequences for presentations or for photo books, to name just some reasons for using this process.

Here’s an example that goes through six easy steps. You need to have both Bridge and Photoshop running on your computer. I am currently using Bridge CC 2017 and Photoshop CC 2017 on the PC, but this works similarly on the Mac and with older versions of the two programs as well.

Step 1: Open Bridge and open the folder that contains the files that you want to print on a sheet, in the right order. Here I am using a folder with twelve “Bodyscapes” files of mine as an example.

2017-09-13 16_28_50-bodyscapes 12 samples.jpg

Step 2:  From the menu, select Tools > Photoshop > Contact Sheet II.

Step 3:  The “Contact Sheet II” window will be activated in Photoshop automatically:

2017-09-13 16_29_49-Adobe Photoshop CC 2017.jpg

Step 4:  Select the size you want the pages to be. For instance, I usually use 8×10” for printing properly on 8.5×11” sheets.

Step 5:  Select the number of columns and rows you want – 4×4 is a good place to start. Do not use filenames as captions unless you want them to be appearing.

Step 6:  Hit the “OK” button, and BINGO! The contact sheets will appear in Photoshop as if by magic, in sequence, and can then be saved and/or printed.

And there’s my contact sheet for this folder!

Enjoy!

Gerry

 

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Jason Fulford & Gregory Halpern – The Photographer’s Playbook

Posted in Books & Magazines, Photographers, Photography by douglaspstockdale on December 3, 2016

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Copyright 2014 Jason Fulford & Gregory Halpern published by Aperture

While in Santa Fe last month and visiting the photo-eye book store, I had an opportunity to purchase a copy of Jason Fulford and Gregory Halpern’s book The Photographer’s Playbook. The subtitle reveals the essentials of this book; 307 (photographic) Assignments and Ideas, which are distilled from 307 photographers, curators, photographic academia and workshop leaders, including Aline Smithson, Mark Steinmetz, Jim Goldberg, Stephen Shore, John Gossage and many more. From my perspective, this book draws heavily on a few photographic academia programs for BFA and MFA photographic degrees.

It appears that the book is focused on young and inexperienced photographers who are searching for the reason to be a fine art photographer (as part of a BFA/MFA program) or for a photographer who is stuck in a dry spell as to how to find conceptual ideas to development next. If you have the technical side of photography down then working through a bunch of these assignments could provide you with an equivalent BFA/MFA education as to the conceptual projects you work on. What may be missing is the group critiques offered in the academic programs and instructors that might challenge you (alternatively a best friend that can continue to say “No, try again, dig deeper”). So find a small group photographic/artist peers that you can count on to be candid and talk/show the work/assignments, a group who can say “Very cool, I see where you are going, keep at it, dig deeper”

To be candid, there are some ideas within this book that are similar to other ideas I have developed over the years to help me consider photographic options and move my concepts forward. I will continue to write about some of them, such as my post earlier this morning about experiment-play (games), a frequent idea (27 different variations) that is recommended in this book. In my case, experiment-play was what I was doing that led me to my Memory Pods project that I have been working on for just about three years. Recently, experiment-play is what inspired me to start the Middle Ground (aka Life in the Slow Lane) project earlier this year.

To be fully transparent, as a portfolio reviewer for LensCulture, we also provide some resource recommendations as part of the portfolio review and this book is one that I recommend to photographers who have a photo technique but appear to looking for a project to apply their process. Recommended!

Cheers,

Douglas Stockdale, Editor

(originally posted on Singular Images)

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FREE – Test Think Tank’s Photo’s New Camera Carrying System

Posted in Photographers, Photography by Gina Genis on March 15, 2012

Think Tank's New Modular System

Hey Photogs, want to try out this cool new camera gear carrying system for FREE? Think Tank has allowed my followers to do just that for 28 days. It’s great because you can configure it to your personal needs. Add a lens pouch, take one away. Travel with everything, or travel light. Your choice. Click here for full details.