The Photo Exchange

Ellen Butler – Bill Collins: Exhibition

Posted in Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on July 14, 2015

Ellen Butler - Bill Collins Exhibition 07-2015

Ellen Butler and Bill Collins are inviting everyone to come Sunday July 12th to their exhibition opening in Long Beach.


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BC Space gallery – Photographers Exchange Reception

Posted in Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on July 12, 2015

BC Space PX exhibition 07-09-15 - Rachael Kleinhenz

BC Space PX exhibition – photograph by Raquel Landworth-Kleinhenz

Last Thursday evening (July 9th, 2015) was a wonderfully well attended reception at the BC Space gallery for the Photographers Exchange exhibition opening. As stated in an earlier update, the exhibition will be on display through August 30th, 2015.

Following are some additional photographs from the opening reception;

BC Space reception - Photographs Exchange Exhibition_5

BC Space reception - Photographs Exchange Exhibition_4

Roger Bennett_BC-Space_07-09-15

Roger Bennett with his print

BC Space reception - Photographs Exchange Exhibition_2


Douglas Stockdale with his two prints, photography by Diane Reeves

BC Space reception - Photographs Exchange Exhibition_1

BC Space reception - Photographs Exchange Exhibition_3

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BC Gallery Exhibition – update

Posted in Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on July 3, 2015

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Photographer’s Exchange: L -R, Scott Mathews Water Drop, Larry Vogel Guardians of the Sacred, Michael Weitzman Without Love.

BC Space Gallery is pleased to present its new exhibition: The Photographer’s Exchange: A Quarter Century of Sharing the Light.

The Photographer’s Exchange was founded in 1990 by accomplished fine art photographers Larry Vogel and Larry Weise. They were joined shortly thereafter by avid collector Larry Pribble. The three Larrys as they became known, shared a passion for the art and exacting craft of photography and were seeking a way to share their enthusiasm with kindred spirits.

What began as the occasional gathering of a few fellow enthusiasts gradually evolved into a formal organization with dramatically expanded membership, and regular monthly meetings at which they shared information on traditional and new photographic techniques and processes, worthwhile exhibitions, and critiqued each others work.

Never a camera club, the Photo Exchange has remained focused on bringing its members together to enhance their visual literacy through freely sharing their passion and knowledge of the art of photography. This collection of work in this exhibition represents the culmination of twenty five years of “Sharing The Light” and clearly illustrates that the collective can indeed be greater than the sum of its parts.

There will be an opening reception for The Photographer’s Exchange: A Quarter Century of Sharing the Light on Thursday, July 9, 2015, from 6-9 PM at BC Space Gallery, 235 Forest Ave, Laguna Beach, CA 92651. The public is welcome and the event is free.

The exhibition will be on display through August 30. Normal gallery hours are 1-5 PM Fridays through Sunday.

For further information, check the website at or contact the gallery at (949) 497-1880. Additional contacts are: Scott Mathews (714) 345-7595, Bill Edwards (949) 307-5360, and Jim Koch (949) 646-2242.

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Eye of the Beholder exhibition – final week at BC Space Gallery

Posted in Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by douglaspstockdale on March 20, 2015


The Eye of the Beholder exhibition is in its final week at BC Space Gallery. This combination of innovative camera obscuras by San Francisco photographer Jo Babcock combined with the whimsical drawings of Costa Mesa artist Bruce Barton challenge the age old debate of the camera vs. the mind’s eye as the source of artistic creation.
There will be a closing reception for the exhibition on Sunday, March 22, from 4-6 PM to be followed by a light repast and showing the documentary movie Tim’s Vermeer. This intriguing movie, produced by Penn and Teller, explores the possible use of a camera obscura by 17th Century painter Johannes Vermeer a century before light sensitive materials and photography as we know it, was discovered. Music will be provided by The Liquid Window Project with Vincent Mitchell on Bass, Dan Olney on drums, and Carras Paton on Sax.

The closing reception is free (yep, FREE) to the public, but donations are requested for dinner and the movie. Reservations are encouraged. For additional information on the film see:

For other viewings of the exhibition and reservations for dinner and film, please contact BC Space at (949) 497-1880 or (preferable) A preview of the show may also be seen at





The Strangeness Of The Exhibition (A Surreal Short Story)

Posted in Photograph Exhibits, Uncategorized by jeffalu on February 11, 2015




A bottle of wine flies across the room and I see some kind of orange substance ground into the floor near the bar.  There are multiple, quiet conversations taking place, none of which I can resolve, nor which I care about, though I swear that I hear someone say, “boring”.  A woman approaches and asks me about something.  I’m sure I can hear her but nothing is making sense.  Something about intent.  There are too many lights and they are bright and distracting.  There are numerous people who appear to be staring at me.  They each have jiggling glasses of wine and I can smell them.  The floor below me feels soggy.  I see the bar, and the bartender is staring at me as well, but his eyes are more compassionate.  Through the window looking outside, I see many white lights quickly moving by.  Then there are bright red lights which move by much more frantically, and there is a loud sound.

The sound of the siren is excruciating and it sends me through some kind of barrier.  It awakens me.  I’m aware of a woman standing next to me and she is smiling.  She appears to be waiting for me to respond.  As I’ve learned to do, I apologize to her and ask her to repeat the question.  She asks me what my intent was when I took this photo.  She points, and I turn and look at the photo on the wall in the frame and I see a black and white representation of a crack in the ground with a pylon next to it.  Did I take that photo?  I think I would love to jump into it.  Something about it makes me want to scream for joy.  As to my intent, I recall the crack and the pylon asking me if I would please take their photo before they vanish, and I obeyed.  But I cannot say this to the woman.  I look back to the bartender for pointers and in hopes that he will send me a few words to play with but he is talking and pouring wine.  As a last resort, I think of something I’ve rehearsed and spit it out:  ‘The shapes are what intrigued me here.’   Then I pause.  In my nervousness I cannot remember the next part, and she stares at me but I give her my ‘final face’ so she’ll have to be satisfied.  ‘I see’, she says and then she quietly walks away.  My heart is pounding.  Flustered, I attempt to move toward the bar.

My journey there will not be an easy one.  There will be interruptions and mishaps along the way.  It’s possible that I will walk into someone and cause them to spill their wine.  They will question me about my photos and I’ll be forced to speak with them and will most likely spit out a rehearsed response.  Each step that I take increases my chances for an embarrassing encounter.  Someone reaches out and grabs my arm.  ‘Your work is beautiful’, they say.  I spit out a ‘thank you’ and continue toward the bar.  Someone else turns and faces me directly with a sad expression on their face, and utters, ‘Your work makes me feel so sad’.  I spit out an ‘I’m sorry’ and they smile, turning away.  I continue on but before I can move very far I trip over someone’s leg and fall forward, spilling their wine.  My hand lands in the puddle and arms grab at me to lift me up.  “I’m sorry”, I spit out, turning red as they lift me, and everyone is smiling.  As if nothing has happened, the conversations continue, though I still can’t resolve them.  I do hear someone say, ‘very trite’, however.   I try to stand back up straight but it’s difficult.  The room is so bright and confusing.  I continue forward and can see that the bar is now within my grasp.  There is the bartender with his compassionate eyes looking at me.  Behind him on the white wall I can see writing in black: ‘Photography by’ and then my own name in cursive.

I stumble into the bar and without diverting his gaze away from me the bartender moves to brace a few bottles of wine setting there.  I spit out, ‘I’m sorry” and he grins, and lifts up a brown bowl full of orange objects.  ‘Not to worry, have a cheese puff’, he offers.  There are numerous bowls filled with orange objects along the bar.  I look at them and then look back at the bowl he is holding.  I move to reach for one but am interrupted by a crash as someone drops a glass of wine behind me.  I look back but can’t see any broken glass and no one is reacting.  I turn back to the bowl of orange objects and touch one.  They feel soft and gritty. ‘His work is somewhat derivative’, I make out from a random direction as I taste the saltiness of the puff and look to the bartender for approval.  Still grinning, he lowers the bowl.  ‘You’re having quite a time today.’ he says, and then, ‘My name is Benny.  Benny the bartender.  And how are you, Mr. Jeff?’  He points to the wall behind him without turning away from me just as I begin to ask how he knows my name.  ‘You’re the star today, Mr. Jeff.  Everyone knows your name, a name worth knowing’.  He grins another grin and offers up the bowl again.  I shake my head and from another direction I think I hear someone say, ‘Photoshop?  Figures.’

A person approaches from the left, grabs my arm, and yells at me in a very high voice, ‘Your work reminds me of certain scenes from my childhood!’  It jolts me and in my reaction, I knock a bottle of wine off the bar which Benny matter-of-factly catches before it hits the ground.  I look to my left and a large male body builder type is there, waiting for my response.  I spit out, ‘thank you’.  The body builder nods, slaps my back with vigor, and quickly walks away.  I look to Benny who has his hand over his mouth, shoulders bouncing.  He takes his hand away and shrugs.  ‘Well, it would seem that many people admire you work.’, he says.  I nod and take another cheese puff, this one damp with wine.  From a direction perpendicular to the bar I hear, “Not much talent here.  I could do that.”

‘Benny’, I whisper, ‘believe it or not, I’m not having a good time here at all.  In fact I’m feeling very misunderstood’.  Benny, looking at me with those understanding eyes, says, ‘You know, I’m an artist too.  No, really!   You wouldn’t know it I realize, I mean, I’m the bartender here, but I do have to make a living.  I never feel misunderstood because I try to communicate my intentions through my art in a way that is so obvious that no one could possibly misunderstand.’  I think about this and I wonder if it’s even possible for art to communicate so directly.  I know for sure that my own art doesn’t communicate that way.  So I ask Benny, ‘What would you do if your art didn’t communicate directly, and there was so much left to interpretation that your audience couldn’t possibly know your intentions?’  Benny thought about this for a moment, and then answered, ‘Well, I suppose I would have to let them know through some other outlet’.

I think about this as I glance up and again notice my name on the wall.  Seeing it up there is somewhat reassuring, and I suddenly feel the need to boldly express myself in words, so I blurt out very loudly, “This entire exhibition is a waste of fuckin’ time!  It doesn’t at all represent how I feel or who I am or what I do!  When I’m out taking pictures, there’s HEAT, there’s DIRT, there’s NOISE, there’s EXCITEMENT!  But here, what do we have?  A clean, air conditioned room with wine and cheese puffs and uninformed people and my photos hanging nicely in neat little rows and in perfect little frames!  It’s all so completely counter to my mindset as an artist and even as a human being!  You know what I think the perfect exhibition would be?  I would take my photos and attach them to my Jeep and drive at least 100 miles per hour, and force you mother fuckers to drive along side of me to see my work!  Then maybe you would understand my mindset and who I am and just who the fuck it is you’re dealing with!”

After I finish, there is a silence the likes of which I’ve not heard since before I was conceived and I look at Benny who has eyes bigger and wider than any I have ever imagined.  Benny being Benny, he quickly recovers and says, ‘I think that came off very well.  Consider yourself understood!”  We mutually smile at one another at which point it all rushes back to me, the nervousness, the unconfident feelings, the feeling that I’m once again alone on a planet in another solar system and I am caught wearing unmatching socks.  Benny immediately understands of course, and shoots me a look of sympathy, as a monster approaches from the right and says in a whiney voice, “You know, I really liked your speech. It brought back to me subtle feelings of my last family vacation to Las Vegas.  But your photos do need a little work.’  I look back at Benny in disbelief and in a moment of weakness he can only hold up another brown bowl and mutter, ‘Cheese puff Mr. Jeff?’

I shudder.  Having reached a limit of sorts, I jerk quickly to the left and knock two bowls of cheese puffs into the air with such force that even Benny cannot catch them in time.  The cheese puffs fly upward, and when they land they are squished into the floor by my own shoes as I attempt to flee.  I find that I am immediately blocked by lovers of my work and so am forced to stop short, and adopting a false smile, I again slowly attempt to work my way through the crowd. Along my journey, I am asked questions and receive many compliments, the most poignant of which is,  “Your work makes me feel like I already know you, kind of like I AM you, which really pisses me off, because I mean, why the hell would I want to know you, let alone BE you?”  I continue slowly moving forward, until I finally make my way through the chilled room, out the front door and into the warm night, a few lingering admirers still trying to grab at me for punctuation.

I see many lights quickly moving by, and there are sounds that are immediately relaxing to me.  I take multiple deep breaths, and begin to gain my senses back.  It feels great to feel less insane.  I hear in the far distance the sounds of a marching band, there must be a parade somewhere. I concentrate on the passing cars and they ground me.  The full moon is lighting everything just enough so that I can hear what I see.  The music from the band is growing louder and I’m beginning to feel its vibrations.  I look to my right and in the moonlight I can see dancing reflections along the sidewalk. They pulsate to the rhythm of the music.  As they approach, I consider my current position in life and fear that I have a long way to go.  I realize that it doesn’t matter what others think, but it also doesn’t matter what I think.  I wonder if it’s possible to figure anything out but I also understand that it’s best not to worry about it.  The vibrations become critical and the marching band is right in front of me and there are tubas, trombones, trumpets, accordions, and a bass and snare drum.  They begin to circle around me on the narrow sidewalk.  They are playing very loudly and aggressively in tones and rhythms that are foreign to me.  Each band member is wearing a T-shirt with an imprint in large, red lettering that says, “None of this has to be how it is.”  Out of fear, I consider escaping back into the gallery and visiting with my admirers, but the music doesn’t allow for it.  I can hear each player playing individually as they move past me and it’s hypnotic.  Each instrument sounds unique but they all seem to be speaking with one voice in a unified chant which I take to be singing my praises.  I realize that I’ve been successful here today.  Everyone is here for me.  They all came for me.  Maybe it shouldn’t matter that they don’t understand me.

Four tubas stop in front of me and face me.  I can feel their vibrations very strongly.  They slowly move closer and closer.  The band which is now playing at fever pitch suddenly stops and there is silence.  I can only hear the cars passing  by.  The tuba players slowly begin to lean back and inhale as deeply as possible and when they’ve reached capacity they pause, looking at me with eyes of warning.  I pray that they won’t, but I know otherwise.  They lean forward quickly and exhale through their instruments with such force that all of the gallery windows shatter completely.

The sound of the tubas are excruciating and they send me through some kind of barrier.  They awaken me.  I look around and the band is gone.  My ears are ringing.  I turn and walk back inside the gallery.  Everything is cold and pristine and the room is empty.  I can hear the air conditioner.  Benny is there and I look at him and there are the bottles of wine on the bar and he stares back at me blankly.  ‘Benny, do you think anyone will come to my opening?’, I ask.  ‘Who the fuck is Benny?’ he yells as he grabs up one of the bottles from the bar and with an off-putting glare, launches it across the room.

Photo LA & Classic Photographs LA last weekend

Posted in Photo Art Business, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by douglaspstockdale on January 22, 2015

Photo LA – 2015

Having missed Photo LA for the last two years and growing a little disappointed with the show, I was pleasantly surprised by this year’s event. It was clean, fresh, and much easier to navigate than past shows. This year I opted to take a docent tour led by Eve Schillo, Curatorial Assistant in the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department at LACMA. Schillo added more relevancy with her running commentary on many of the artists and why they are considered “worthy” of inclusion. She elaborated on the labor over time going into creating many of the pieces, such as the eight-hour exposures of Chris McCaw and the prevalence of contemporary works using alternative processes such as tintype, cyanotype, and platinum.

Docent tour of Photo LA before the crowds arrive:


Photo LA

Some of my favorites were works by Jennah Ward (cameraless cyanotypes), Jacob Gils (huge composites), Rosemary Warner(montaged prints), Susan Burnstine, Nick Brandt, Jo Whaley, Mona Kuhn, Hiromu Kira, Tadao Ando, Bart Synowiec, Bruce Davidson, Eric Holubow, David Adey (raised pinned images), and Susan Turner. It was also nice to see old favorites like Dr. Dain Tasker’s x-ray photos from the 1930s and the work of the late James Fee.

Eve Schillo discussing landscapes by Photo LA honoree Catherine Opie:


Abstracts using light as a key element by Barbara Kastin:


Copyright Barbara Kastin

Cameraless cyanotypes by Jennah Ward:


Copyright Jennah Ward

Printer Amanasalto Working with Platinum:

Also exhibiting was a Japanese company, Amanasalto, that is making platinum prints from contemporary photographers as well as masters like Imogen Cunningham. They were beautiful prints but not to be confused with originals printed by the photographer.


Copyright the estate of Imogen Cunningham, print by Amanasalto

APA LA’s Off the Clock

For the first year, 100 winning photos from the American Photographic Artist’s (APA) annual contest Off The Clock were displayed at Photo LA. If you are a photographer, this is yet another reason to consider joining APA and to participate in their many events.

Photo LA Downloadable Catalog:

For more information and to see more images from the show, download Photo LA’s 128-page catalog here.

Classic Photographs Los Angeles


Entrance, Classic Photo LA

A few years ago, a number of galleries that carry primarily “classic” (black & white) photography split from Photo LA and started their own show. This year it was again held at Bonhams auction house. It was easy to spend an afternoon there and enjoy looking at the variety of Classic and Contemporary photographs including work by: Ray K. Metzker, Val Telberg, Bruce Wrighton, George Tice, Brigitte Carnochan (hand colored selenium prints), Giacomo Brunelli, Pentti Sammallahti (and his book, Here Far Away) and Sebastiao Salgado. I have eclectic tastes and was tempted by a Muybridge and a lovely Bromoil by an unknown photographer…perhaps next year.

Alex Novack, the man behind iPhotoCentral:

Alex_Novack _Classic_Photo_LA

Several years ago I became acquainted with exhibitor Alex Novack who is the man behind iPhotoCentral, an online resource and gallery collective where buyers can search an enormous inventory of photos. It’s worth checking out whether you are a potential buyer or simply want to educate yourself on what’s available.

If you are interested in learning more about collecting, I highly recommend subscribing to Alex’s newsletter. He sends it when he can (almost monthly) and it consistently contains a wealth of information from around the world.

PhotoExchange Contributor: Nancy Albright


Three Great Photo/Art Shows In LA Next Week

Posted in Photo Art Business, Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by douglaspstockdale on January 9, 2015

Next week is a fabulous time to make a trip to Los Angeles for anyone interested in art and photography. With three huge shows listed below, one can see the work of the hottest artists, up-and-coming artists, and tried-and-true masters. There is sure to be something to impress and inspire all working artists/photographers.

LA Art Show 2015: (Historic, Modern and Contemporary Art including Photography) at the Los Angeles Convention Center: (January 14-18) Discount tickets can be purchased through Groupon.

Photo LA: (The 24th Annual International Los Angeles Photographic Art Exposition) at THE REEF/LA Mart (January 15-18) This show includes docent tours and a number of classes for photographers and collectors.

Classic Photographs LA: Galleries and dealers of classic photography at BONHAMS (January 17 & 18). See the work of masters of photography with many pieces quite reasonably priced.

Guest Contributor: Nancy Albright


Posted in Juried opportunities, Photo Art Business, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by douglaspstockdale on January 3, 2015

I would like to take this opportunity to personally INVITE YOU  to participate in the International Photography Contest PHOTO ANNUAL AWARDS 2015

Since I work both as a photographer, curator and publisher, I am fully aware of the importance and the greatness of your work.
My particular desire is that the Photo Annual Awards, which is held under my leadership, will achieve good quality participation.

The contest results will be exhibited – as in last 4 years – in the Wall Gallery in Teplice, near Prague.
(see last Opening Ceremony:

The exhibition time is overlapping with the beginning of the 861th Teplice Spa Season.
Since this event annually attracts the attention of more than 50,000 VISITORS, my task is to exhibit the real jewels of modern photography – like your photography.
(see – for example – last winners

For Grand Prize Winner is  $500 cash and Art Residence for one month in romantic chapell

And finally: All 2015 winner photos will be publish in photo magazine Art Photo Mag (
(list of published photographers in Art Photo Mag is here

Early Bird for contestant:
Entry fee for contest is 5 EUR per photo, but to the end of February you have special discount – only 3 EUR per photo.

Contest Deadline: April 19, 2015. Don´t forget please.
Thank you very much and I look forward to seeing your photo at our Opening Ceremony.

Link for upload of photos:

Yours sincerely

Radek Burda
Director PAA 2015 & Publisher Art Photo Mag

Douglas Stockdale: curator 10 x 10 American Photobooks

Posted in Books & Magazines, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on May 20, 2013

10 x 10 American Photobooks, selection by Douglas Stockdale

Over the weekend, the second phase of the 10 x 10 American Photobooks reading room project was provided at the PGH Photo Fair held at the UnSmoke Systems Artspace (Braddock, PA). This is a continuation of a photobook project that was started in 2012 on Facebook, for which 10 curators chose 10 photobooks created by Japanese photographers. For 2013, the 10 x 10 emphasis was placed on American photographers, but limited to books that were published since 1985. There are two groups of curators, those who selected photobooks in which the photobook would be available as a physical object, to be held, read, and time spent at a venue called the reading room. The second group of curators, one of which I was fortunate to be a member of, made their selection of 10 photobooks and provided links on their web site. I had posted my selection of 10 photobooks on my blog The Photobook. which includes links to the reviews of almost all of the books I selected.

The reading room photobooks are now being packed for the final installation at the Tokyo Institute of Photography (Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan), which will take place September 11 thru October 6yh (2013).


Douglas Stockdale

Jessica Eaton – Polytopes at M+B Gallery

Posted in Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by Jim McKinniss on December 22, 2012

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton


Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton



Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton



Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton


Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

M+B is pleased to present Jessica Eaton’s first Los Angeles exhibition, Polytopes. Eaton’s latest work views the world through the capabilities of photography using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as color separation filtration, additive color theory, multiple exposures, motion blur, in-camera masking, cross polarization and lighting techniques. Building on her highly reviewed series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt (cfaal) with Polytopes Eaton develops more configurations from repeated fragments, constructing sculptural works on sheets of large format film. The haunting, luminescent images bloom and grow before the viewer, the result of layered time and additive color theory. Polytopes runs from November 3, 2012 through January 5, 2013, with an opening reception for the artist on Saturday, November 3 from 6 to 8 pm.
Eaton shapes her latest artistic output “in camera” through multiple exposures and the use of different colored filters. In two new works, cfaal 276 and cfaal 279 the tactile, present nature of the work is exemplified through lush details of textured wood grain and large brush strokes radiantly depicted under added colors, their reflections offering up an engaging dimensionality to the work. Bold, vibrant angels energetically cut across space in Eaton’s Tri/Colour/Angles work, the moment of potential, surprise and experimentation revealed at their aligning points. The use of the artist’s studio as laboratory further expands in Eaton’s Interpolation Dramatizations and RGB Weaves – the artist’s analogue take on a digital solution. Through multiple exposures Eaton uses blur and stepped exposures to symbolize the bicubic smoother or Nearest Neighbor – interpolations algorithms used by imaging softwares such as Photoshop. Eaton’s process and the fascinating result is a conversation with the world, navigating the forces of time and space the viewer is presented with a striking sense of possibility.
Jessica Eaton (b. 1977, Regina, Saskatchewan) holds a BFA in photography from the Emily Carr Institute in Vancouver, British Columbia. Her work focuses on the possibilities of the medium and is often experimental in nature. Jessica has been the recipient of the Grand Prix du Jury for the Hyères Fashion and Photography Festival 2012, Foam International Photography Magazine Talent Call 2012, the Bright Spark Award for the Magenta Foundation Flash Forward Emerging Photographers from the UK, Canada and USA 2011, “Hey, Hot Shot”, Jen Bekman Gallery, 2010 and was awarded a Canada Council for the Arts research and creation grant 2011. Eaton’s photographs have been published in numerous publications including Foam, Border Crossings, The British Journal of Photography (cover March 2012), ARTnews (cover image March 2011), BlackFlash, Colour Magazine, Pyramid Power, Hunter and Cook and Lay Flat 02: Meta. Jessica Eaton lives and works in Montréal. This is her first solo exhibition at M+B.

 For more info, please contact Alexandra Wetzel at M+B at (310) 550-0050 or

M+B Gallery is located at 612 North Almont Drive, Los Angeles, California 90069

This exhibition runs through December 22, 2012

By Jim McKinniss


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