SoCal PhotoExchange

The Photographer’s Guide to Marketing and Self-Promotion

Posted in Photo Art Business, Photo techniques, Photo Workshops, Photography by douglaspstockdale on October 18, 2017

The_Photographers_Guide_to_Marketing_cover

Maria Piscopo – The Photographer’s Guide to Marketing and Self-Promotion

Publisher: Allworth Press (NY), Fifth Edition, copyright 2016

While developing my Marketing Your Photo Book workshop for LACP (Note: this one-day workshop has space available, Oct 29th, at LACP) I came across Maria Piscopo’s The Photographer’s Guide to Marketing and Self-Promotion. Since this title was in its fifth edition I figured that this book has stood the test of time and photographer have kept buying it and thus might be worth checking out. What I anticipated was this is a generalist guide for a broad spectrum of photographers, not specific to the needs of artist and photographers who were marketing a small niche product like a self-published book.

My background includes graduate level marketing classes that was part of my focus while I was getting my M.B.A.  Since that course work was even more general maybe Piscopo’s book might help with some photographic market specifics that I might not be aware of. Last, this might make an interesting reference book for those attending my workshop.

Well it turns out that Maria Piscopo’s book is intended entirely for professional photographers while the fine art market is treated as a side-line and provided a short chapter in the back of the book. I had expected a little better organization of the content, but at least many of the parts for a Marketing program appear to be present.

Much of this book is about the very business basics (and I do mean basics) of professional photography; business licenses, business ethics, getting organized, using a computer (e.g. bookkeeping), and an introduction to how to use the internet for event, wedding, and commercial. Writing a Marketing plan does not occur until almost the end of the book, something I might think would be the first thing to consider for a Marketing book. Which is to say, this book is not a very good guide for Marketing and you might be better off with a college basic Marketing text book.

If on the other hand you are very new to having your own business and have not done this before,  yet you think you might want to be a professional photographer, this book might be of some help to make sure you have most of your business bases covered. This will not be a reference book for my Book Marketing workshop and not to say that occasionally there are some little gems buried in the book, just finding these can be more frustrating that what it is worth to me. It might be ideal for you.

Best regards,

Douglas Stockdale

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Creating “Contact Sheets” Using Adobe Bridge and Photoshop

Posted in Photo techniques, Photography, Uncategorized by Gerhard Clausing on September 13, 2017

If you have wanted to create sheets that show sets of images in your folders or  series, in order to print them like the “contact sheets” from analog times, this is fairly easy to do. Reasons for doing so might be that you want to keep a printed visual record of what’s in your project folders or project collections, or you might want to document possible sequences for presentations or for photo books, to name just some reasons for using this process.

Here’s an example that goes through six easy steps. You need to have both Bridge and Photoshop running on your computer. I am currently using Bridge CC 2017 and Photoshop CC 2017 on the PC, but this works similarly on the Mac and with older versions of the two programs as well.

Step 1: Open Bridge and open the folder that contains the files that you want to print on a sheet, in the right order. Here I am using a folder with twelve “Bodyscapes” files of mine as an example.

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Step 2:  From the menu, select Tools > Photoshop > Contact Sheet II.

Step 3:  The “Contact Sheet II” window will be activated in Photoshop automatically:

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Step 4:  Select the size you want the pages to be. For instance, I usually use 8×10” for printing properly on 8.5×11” sheets.

Step 5:  Select the number of columns and rows you want – 4×4 is a good place to start. Do not use filenames as captions unless you want them to be appearing.

Step 6:  Hit the “OK” button, and BINGO! The contact sheets will appear in Photoshop as if by magic, in sequence, and can then be saved and/or printed.

And there’s my contact sheet for this folder!

Enjoy!

Gerry

 

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