The Photo Exchange

tPE member Barbara Ruffini selected for Los Angeles Center of Photography

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 11, 2014

RUFFINI-All That We See Or Seem

All That We See or Seem copyright by Barbara Ruffini.

Long time member of The Photo Exchange, Barbara Ruffini, has had a photograph selected for the Grand Opening and Member’s Exhibition at Los Angeles Center of Photography.

According to Barbara:

The image is part of a greater on-going series of exploration I call, The Space Between
 
This image in particular is about looking. Looking, seeking, wondering, imagining, dreaming … what we see, what we think we see, what we hope to see, and what we dream. There is also an underlying note of whimsy, of course. After all, the mask, which blinds, has eyes painted upon it. (wink).
 

LACP is located at Hollywood at 1515 N. Wilcox Avenue, on the corner of Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood, CA

Opening date is Saturday, July 12, 7 – 11 pm

RSVP info@lacphoto.org 

 

By Jim McKinniss

NAN GOLDIN: EDEN AND AFTER

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 7, 2014

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Photo copyright by Nan Goldin

 

I subscribe to Lenscratch.com and so get its daily updates. I recommend the blog to everyone.

Here is the link to today’s post (July 7, 2014)

http://lenscratch.com/2014/07/nan-goldin-eden-and-after/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lenscratch%2FZAbG+%28L++E++N++S++C++R++A++T++C++H%29

By Jim McKinniss

Brooks Jensen – Looking at Images

Posted in Books & Magazines, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on July 7, 2014

Brooks_Jensen_Editor-Looking_at_Images_cover

Copyright the photographers 2014 published by LensWork Publishing

I am very honored to announce that Brooks Jensen has selected one of images from the In Passing project that was published in the #74 edition of LensWork to include in his latest book Looking at Photographs.

Brooks Jensen is the Editor and Publisher of the LensWork journal and almost exclusively is focusing on Black and White photography. The bi-monthly journal is released concurrently in a print edition and a DVD that contains additional portfolios and audio interviews of the artist by Jensen.

He also publishes a series of blog posts that provide extensive homilies about a singular image from the LensWork journal portfolios, which Jensen has collected and becomes the source of this book. Jensen’s photographic essays are sequenced alphabetically as to the photographer work that he is discussing.

I have posted a expanded article about this book on The PhotoBook.

Cheers!

Douglas Stockdale

Looking_at_Images_Douglas_Stockdale-In_Passing

 

 

DANIEL WHEELER: GULP, (Generative Urban Landscape Project) 2005-2008 at Duncan Miller Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 4, 2014
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Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

 

GULP_034_54x54

Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

GULP_050_40x40

Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

 

GULP_064_40x40

Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

 

 

Duncan Miller Gallery is showing its second exhibition of Daniel Wheeler’s GULP series featuring large-format color landscapes of Southern California. Wheeler documents Los Angeles through the waters of a series of back yard swimming pools.

The artist statement regarding this project:

In this photographic project, the ubiquitous Southern California pool becomes a medium through which the surrounding landscape is interpreted. The peculiar garden that is urban Southern California would not exist without water. Here it is viewed through that chlorinated lens. Descending into water, my movement, and the exhalation of my breath, causes distortion of the surface. Pictures are made looking upward. The water is clear, but distorts; the landscape can be intuited but the perspective is indeterminate. The resulting cognitive dissonance forces viewers to sense, rather than read, the images. Verisimilitude has never been my goal: instead it is to provide a sensual springboard for interpretation. My work has addressed issues of self, place, and memory through an appeal to the viewer’s body, using sculptural forms and architecture to do so. This new project takes me back to photography, which was my first love as an artist.

Comprising over 50 large-scale images so far, as well as sculptures and performances in development, GULP represents a new direction for me, while developing directly from the work I have been doing for the past twenty-five years. In installations, drawings, performances and sculptures, I have used the Los Angeles landscape as muse and the body as basic element. In one precursor to GULP, I spent eight months drawing urban street trees on a daily basis, as a way of examining them, but also as a way of mapping my own state of mind.Comprising over 50 large-scale images so far, as well as sculptures and performances in development, GULP represents a new direction for me, while developing directly from the work I have been doing for the past twenty-five years. In installations, drawings, performances and sculptures, I have used the Los Angeles landscape as muse and the body as basic element. In one precursor to GULP, I spent eight months drawing urban street trees on a daily basis, as a way of examining them, but also as a way of mapping my own state of mind.

I found that the project (and the exhibition s effectiveness) benefited from the large number of drawings produced. Although each tree was unique, drawing over 175 of them in a uniform way allowed for reflection on the act of observation itself. The whole became a kind of accumulative phenomenological self-portrait , while situating itself specifically in this place, at this time.I found that the project (and the exhibition’s effectiveness) benefited from the large number of drawings produced. Although each tree was unique, drawing over 175 of them in a uniform way allowed for reflection on the act of observation itself. The whole became a kind of accumulative phenomenological self-portrait , while situating itself specifically in this place, at this time.

Using the sensual immediacy of large-scale photographic imagery I aim to cajole viewers out of their learned response to the environment into a more sensory experience of it, and back into their bodies, so to speak. The images are generated by an action, the descent under water. When viewers stand in front of the finished pictures, they find themselves inserted into the action and by extension into my presence there. The physical nature of the finished objects is therefore intimately connected to their effectiveness. The scale of the images (40 to 60  square), the intensity of the color, the reflective surfaces play crucial roles.

Duncan Miller Gallery is located at 2525 Michigan Avenue, Unit A7, Santa Monica, CA 90404

310 838 2440
info@duncanmillergallery.com

By Jim McKinniss