The Photo Exchange

Christian Patterson – Redheaded Peckerwood at Rose Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 30, 2013
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House on Fire copyright by Christian Patterson

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I Pledge Allegation copyright by Christian Patterson

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Telephone copyright by Christian Patterson

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Winter Coat copyright by Christian Patterson

ROSEGALLERY is pleased to announce the American debut of 2013 Guggenheim Fellow, Christian Patterson’s groundbreaking series, Redheaded Peckerwood

Redheaded Peckerwood is Christian Patterson’s second major body of photographs and the subject of his highly acclaimed monograph, published by MACK in 2011.  The book has been called an “instant classic” and was named one of the best books of the year by Art in America, the New York Times, TIME and the Guardian among many others. Last year the book was awarded the prestigious Recontres d’Arles Author Book Award and it is currently in its third printing.

Redheaded Peckerwood is a work with a tragic underlying narrative – the story of 19 year old Charles Starkweather and 14 year old Caril Ann Fugate who murdered ten people, including Fugate’s family, during a killing spree across Nebraska to their point of capture in Douglas, Wyoming. The images record places and objects central to the story, depict ideas inspired by it, and capture other moments and discoveries along the way.

Christian Patterson does not attempt to piece together the precise circumstances of the murders, or any over-arching narrative; rather, he creates images that speak to the themes he considers fundamental to the story – angst, love, rebellion, escape, violence, and loss of innocence.  He borrows certain points freely and boldly mixes them with fictional elements, using photography as his primary tool.

Redheaded Peckerwood utilizes and plays with an archive of material, deliberately mixing fact and fiction, past and present, myth and reality as it presents, expands and re-presents the various facts and theories surrounding this story. From a technical perspective, the photographs incorporate and reference the techniques of photojournalism, forensic photography, image appropriation, reenactment, documentary, and landscape photography. On a conceptual level, they deal with a charged landscape and play with photographic representation and truth as Patterson deconstructs the pre-existing narrative.

While photographs are the heart of this work, the artist has combined them with documents and objects belonging to the killers and their victims — a map, poem, confession letter, stuffed animal, and hood ornament — which will be exhibited alongside his photographic prints.

Christian Patterson was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.  He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.  His work is found in the permanent collections of The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; The New Orleans Museum of Art; and the Light Work Collection, Syracuse to name a few.  Private collections including the Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell Photography Collection; The Berman Photography Collection; and the collection of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser. This will be Patterson’s first solo exhibition at ROSEGALLERY.  The gallery is pleased to be the artist’s exclusive U.S. representation.

This show runs through August 7, 2013

Rose Gallery is located in Bergamot Station

2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica, CA

Hours: Tues. – Sat. 10 am to 6 pm

Contact: Info@RoseGallery.net

By Jim McKinniss

The Photographer’s Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 29, 2013

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Jet Airliner copyright by Josef Hoflehner

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Photo copyright by Josef Hoflehner

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Blushing Bride copyright by Joyce Tenneson

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Cafe Paris copyright by Saul Leiter

 

At photographers’ gallery our core collection consists of classic and contemporary photographs from talented artists and reputable archives. 

Our eclectic selection provides fine art photography for everyone. 

Photographers’ Gallery has created an open forum where emerging photographers can share their innovative and inspiring work with a diverse audience in the gallery and on the web.

 

By Jim McKinniss

Photographer Sally Mann – Southern Landscapes

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 29, 2013
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Photos copyright by Sally Mann

 

 

“Living in the South means being both nourished and wounded by the experience. 
To identify a person as a Southerner is always to suggest not only that her history 
is inescapable and profoundly formative, but that it is also imperishably present. 
Southerners live at the nexus between myth and reality where that peculiar amalgam 
of sorrow, humility, honor, loyalty, graciousness and renegade defiance plays out 
against a backdrop of profligate physical beauty.”

-Sally Mann

 

“We let the remarkable, ordinary wonders of living slip into the oblivion of memory, 
but they are the very moments Sally Mann lovingly records, resurrects, and returns to 
us. I would not be surprised if at the moment of our deaths the last thoughts that 
flicker before our consciousness look like photographs by Sally Mann, and I will be 
disappointed if mine do not.”

-John Wood

 

By Jim McKinniss

Photographer Sally Mann

Posted in Photographers, Photography, Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 19, 2013
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Photo copyright by Sally Mann

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Photo copyright by Sally Mann

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All photographs are copyright by Sally Mann
Sally Mann was born in Lexington, Virginia in 1951. She has always remained close to her roots. She has photographed in the American South since the 1970s, producing series on portraiture, architecture, landscape and still life. She is perhaps best known for her intimate portraits of her family, her young children and her husband, and for her evocative and resonant landscape work in the American South. Her work has attracted controversy at times, but it has always been influential, and since her the time of her first solo exhibition, at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., in 1977, she has attracted a wide audience.
Sally Mann explored various genres as she was maturing in the 1970s: she produced landscapes and architectural photography, and she blended still life with elements of portraiture. But she truly found her metier with her second publication, a study of girlhood entitled At Twelve: Portraits of Young Women (1988). Between 1984 and 1994, she worked on the series, Immediate Family (1992), which focuses on her three children, who were then all aged under ten. While the series touches on ordinary moments in their daily lives—playing, sleeping, eating—it also speaks to larger themes such as death and cultural perceptions of sexuality. In her most recent series, Proud Flesh, taken over a six year interval, Mann turns the camera onto her husband, Larry. The resultant photographs are candid and frank portraits of a man at his most vulnerable moments.
Mann has produced two major series of landscapes: Deep South (Bullfinch Press, 2005) and Mother Land. In What Remains (Bullfinch Press, 2003), she assembled a five-part study of mortality, one which ranges from pictures of the decomposing body of her beloved greyhound, to the site where an armed fugitive committed suicide on her property in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. She has often experimented with color photography, but she has remained most interested in black and white, especially photography’s antique technology. She has long used an 8×10 bellows camera, and has explored platinum and bromoil printing processes. In the mid 1990s she began using the wet plate collodion process to produce pictures which almost seem like hybrids of photography, painting, and sculpture.
Sally Mann lives and works in Lexington, Virginia. A Guggenheim fellow, and a three-times recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, Mann was named “America’s Best Photographer” by Time magazine in 2001. She has been the subject of two documentaries: Blood Ties(1994), which was nominated for an Academy Award, andWhat Remains (2007) which premiered at Sundance and was nominated for an Emmy for Best Documentary in 2008. She has been the subject of major exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Her photographs can be found in many public and private collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art; and the Whitney Museum of American Art.
By Jim McKinniss

Dan Winters: Last Launch at Fahey/Klein Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 11, 2013

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Photo copyright by Dan Winters

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Photo copyright by Dan Winters

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Photo copyright by Dan Winters

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Photo copyright by Dan Winters

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Photo copyright by Dan Winters

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Photo copyright by Dan Winters

 

Dan Winters’ most recent body of work, Last Launch, a stunning photographic tribute to America’s space shuttle program and the unquenchable American spirit of exploration will be featured in an exhibition at Fahey/Klein Gallery.

Dan Winters grew up in the golden-age of space travel, watching the live launch of Apollo 11 with his family on their home television set and carefully following the mission unfold on TV, hanging on every detail as reported by Walter Cronkrite. This experience left an indelible impression not only on Dan Winters, but on the nation’s collective memory as a whole.

Winters was one of only a handful of photographers to whom NASA gave close-range access to photograph the last launches of the space shuttles Discovery (February 24, 2011), Atlantis (May 17, 2011), and Endeavour (May 11, 2011). Winters positioned several automatically controlled cameras, bolted into place for stability, at strategic points around the launch pads, some as close as 700 feet. The camera lenses are taped into place so they cannot be shaken out of focus by the blast. Tripped by an electronic trigger that reacted to the shuttles’ vibrations, cameras began shooting every five seconds after the ignition occurred. Dan Winters’ elaborate setup enabled him to record the explosive launches and the billowing smoke and ethereal clouds that follow, capturing transcendent images that serve as the last documentation of these shuttles as they were sent hurtling into space.

With precision and admiration, Winters’ photographs of the Discovery shuttle interiors, complex instrumentation, vehicle assembly facilities, and mission control provide the viewer with a visual tour of the space program as a marvel of technology and human ingenuity.

In the introduction to the publication, film maker Al Reinert, summarizes the meaning of the American Space shuttle program, “In the fifty-year history of human space-flight the most authentically human spacecraft, the vehicle that embodied its makers’ hopes and flaws most faithfully, was the American space shuttle. Time and again it carried aloft the dreams of a nation determined to reach beyond itself, launching the truest believers in that grandiose vision and showing the world the risk and wonder of believing in it. For thirty years the shuttle had demonstrated the strength and exposed the weakness of the people who built it, and the whole shares its star-crossed legacy.”

Dan Winters is an award-winning photographer based in Austin, Texas and Los Angeles. Last Launch: Discovery, Endeavour, Atlantis and is Winters’ third publication following, Dan Winters’ America: Icons and Ingenuity (2012), and Dan Winters: Periodical Photographs (2009). Dan Winters is a regular contributor for Vanity Fair, New York Times Magazine, New York Magazine, The New Yorker, GQ, Esquire, Rolling Stone, and Texas Monthly.

 

This exhibition runs July 11, 2013 through August 31, 2013

Fahey/Klein Gallery is located at 148 North La Brea, Los Angeles, CA 90036  

Phone: (323) 934-2250 

 

By Jim McKinniss

Sebastiao Salgado – GENESIS at Peter Fetterman Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 5, 2013

 

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Photo copyright by Sabastiao Salgado

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Photo copyright by Sabastiao Salgado

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Photo copyright by Sabastiao Salgado

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Photo copyright by Sabastiao Salgado

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Photo copyright by Sabastiao Salgado

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Photo copyright by Sabastiao Salgado

 

 

Sebastião Salgado was born on February 8th, 1944 in Aimorés, in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. He lives in Paris. Having studied economics, Salgado began his career as a professional photographer in 1973 in Paris, working with the photo agencies Sygma, Gamma, and Magnum Photos until 1994, when he and Lélia Wanick Salgado formed Amazonas images, an agency created exclusively for his work.

He has travelled in over 100 countries for his photographic projects. Most of these, besides appearing in numerous press publications, have also been presented in books such as Other Americas (1986), Sahel: l’homme en détresse (1986), Sahel: el fin del camino (1988), Workers (1993), Terra (1997), Migrations and Portraits (2000), and Africa (2007). Touring exhibitions of this work have been, and continue to be, presented throughout the world. 

Sebastião Salgado has been awarded numerous major photographic prizes in recognition of his accomplishments. He is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, and an honorary member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences in the United States. 

In 2004, Sebastião Salgado began a project named Genesis, aiming at the presentation of the unblemished faces of nature and humanity. It consists of a series of photographs of landscapes and wildlife, as well as of human communities that continue to live in accordance with their ancestral traditions and cultures. This body of work is conceived as a potential path to humanity’s rediscovery of itself in nature. 

Together, Lélia and Sebastião have worked since the 1990’s on the restoration of a small part of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil. In 1998 they succeeded in turning this land into a nature reserve and created the Instituto Terra. The Instituto is dedicated to a mission of reforestation, conservation and environmental education.

– From Amazonas Images

“I have named this project GENESIS because my aim is to return to the beginnings of our planet: to the air, water and the fire that gave birth to life, to the animal species that have resisted domestication, to the remote tribes whose ‘primitive’ way of life is still untouched, to the existing examples of the earliest forms of human settlement and organization. A potential path towards humanity’s rediscovery of itself. So many times I’ve photographed stories that show the degradation of the planet, I thought the only way to give us an incentive, to bring hope, is to show the pictures of the pristine planet – to see the innocence. And then we can understand what we must preserve.”

– Sebastião Salgado

 

This show runs through October 19, 2013

 

Peter Fetterman Gallery
2525 Michigan Avenue Gallery A1
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Telephone . 310 453 6463

Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 11am – 6pm

By Jim McKinniss