SoCal PhotoExchange

Diane Arbus exhibition at Fahey/Klein

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 27, 2013

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Image copyright by Diane Arbus estate.

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Image copyright by Diane Arbus estate.

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Image copyright by Diane Arbus estate.

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Image copyright by Diane Arbus estate.

 

The Fahey/Klein Gallery is pleased to present a special exhibition of Diane Arbus photographs. Culled over many years, this never-before-exhibited private collection contains several important Arbus photographs including, among others, Russian midget friends in a living room on 100th Street, N.Y.C., 1963; Lady Bartender at home with a souvenir dog, New Orleans, L.A., 1964; Jack Dracula, the Marked Man, N.Y.C., 1961; Two ladies at the automat, N.Y.C., 1966; and Circus fat lady and her dog, Troubles. Diane Arbus remains one of the most influential and revered artists in the history of photography.

Diane Arbus’ portraits of socialites, nudists, transvestites, carnival performers, and eccentrics reflect her long-standing interest in subcultures and the rituals of groups within society. Arbus closely collaborated with her subjects by posing them, engaging them in conversations, and spending time in their homes and environments. This process set Arbus apart from her contemporaries, and resulted in images that are formal and deliberate, but also exceedingly personal. In turn, each portrait becomes an engaging collaboration between the subject, photographer, and viewer. “Privately, Arbus compared her photographic approach to gathering a butterfly collection, a metaphor that evokes both the evanescent quality of photography and its scientific objectivity.” (Sandra S. Phillips, The Question of Belief, “Diane Arbus: Revelations”, Random House, 2003)

Arbus’ images contain a paradoxical element which uncovers the strange in the everyday while simultaneously revealing the familiar in the unknown. Diane Arbus’ images investigate the nature of identity, and explore the difference between how her subjects want to be seen and how others see them— what Arbus referred to as the “gap between intention and effect”. Arbus’ photographs acknowledge her subjects’ complexity and duality, and in turn reveal the defining characteristics of each person.

“Arbus’ particular contribution as an artist was not in what kinds of people she approached to photograph, but in what she was able to derive from the experience. Her devotion to the principles of the art she practiced—without deference to any extraneous social or political agenda—has produced a body of work that is often shocking in its purity, in its bold commitment to the celebration of things as they are. Her refusal to patronize the people she photographed, her acceptance of the challenge of the encounter constitutes a deep and abiding humanism.” (Sandra S. Phillips, The Question of Belief, “Diane Arbus: Revelations”, Random House, 2003)

In 1967, Diane Arbus was included with her contemporaries Garry Winogrand and Lee Friedlander, in the hugely significant exhibition “New Documents” at the Museum of Modern Art, New York curated by John Szarkowski. A posthumous retrospective of her work was exhibited at MoMA in 1972, one year after her death.

 

This show runs March 28, 2013 through May 18, 2013

The Fahey/Klein Gallery is located at 148 North La Brea, Los Angeles, CA 90036 

Hours: 10:00 am to 6:00 pm Tuesday through Saturday

Phone: (323) 934-2250

 

By Jim McKinniss

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Georges Dambier at Petter Fetterman

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 7, 2013
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Photo copyright by Georges Dambier and courtesy Peter Fetterman Gallery

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Photo copyright by Georges Dambier and courtesy of Peter Fetterman Gallery

Peter Fetterman Gallery is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibitions: Georges Dambier (1925-2011), a solo exhibition of significant 1950’s fashion photography and Paris in the Springtime, a group exhibition featuring classic masterpieces of humanist photography. Both exhibitions open simultaneously with a reception on Saturday, March 23rd from 4-7pm and are on view through June 8, 2013.

Georges Dambier (1925-2011) began his career in post-war Paris as a photojournalist with a background in graphic design and portraiture before he began photographing for fashion magazines in the 1940s. Although often overlooked in the history of fashion photography, Dambier was a contemporary of Irving Penn and Richard Avedon and became the key photographer for French Elle after receiving his first job from director Helene Lazzareff. The photographs on display, most of which have never been exhibited, are from a period of the 1950s at the height of his career photographing legendary models including Suzy Parker, Bettina, Barbara Mullen, Brigitte Bardot, Capucine and Sophie Litvak. The artist’s close friendship with many of his models produced uniquely humble fashion imagery showing chic feminine style at ease in everyday situations; the models are confident yet still delicate while in action on city sidewalks, beaches and in hotels. This is the first west coast exhibition of Dambier’s work and consists of over thirty prints that display his masterful use of lighting and focus to create arresting images of style and femininity.

Paris in the Springtime exhibits photographs documenting daily life in the French capital during the mid-20th Century by legendary photographers of the era. As Peter’s favorite city, Paris has always been a consistent theme of the gallery’s collection specializing in French humanist photography. As a close friend and collaborator, legendary photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson was instrumental in introducing many of his contemporaries to the gallery including several of the exhibited artists such as Willy Ronis, Martine Franck, Edouard Boubat, Louis Stettner, Melvin Sokolsky and more. Iconic photographs and rare gems from thirty years of collecting fine classic photography display the essence of the City of Light through the eyes of some of its greatest historical spectators.

Georges Dambier April, 1925 – May, 2011

Born in 1925, Georges Dambier first went to work for painter Paul Colin, where he learnt drawing and graphic design. Then he landed a job as assistant to Willy Rizzo, a famous portraitist photographer (Harcourt’s Studio, Paris Match). There, he discovered photography and was taught the fundamentals of this art, especially lighting.

Georges Dambier was 20 when the Second World War came to an end, a moment when the social scene in Paris suddenly took off. Nightlife, subdued during the Occupation, exploded. Le Bœuf sur le toit, Le Lido, la Rose Rouge, Le Lorientais, Le Tabou : he frequented cabarets and jazz clubs in Saint Germain des Prés, where famous artists and celebrities organised glittering parties and balls. One night, he managed to take pictures of Rita Hayworth who had come incognito to a famous night club, Le Jimmy’s. He sold the exclusive images to France Dimanche, a daily magazine recently created by Max Corre and Pierre Lazareff, and won himself a job on the magazine as a photo-reporter. In his new post, he was sent to all over the world to cover current events. However, with his predilection for graphic design and aesthetics, his liking for refined mise-en-scene, and at the urging of many friends, such as Capucine, Suzy Parker, Jacques Fath, Bettina, Brigitte Bardot, Jean Barthet, he was lead towards fashion photography.

As Georges Dambier built and perfected his craft, he was hired by Helene Lazareff, director of ELLE, the fashion magazine. She encouraged him and gave him his first assignment as a fashion photographer. Georges Dambier did not conform to the standard technique of taking fashion pictures, with models standing emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, he showed models smiling, laughing and often in action. His models were surrounded by local people in a market place in Marrakech, or in a village in Corsica, or – and above all – in his beloved Paris.

Most of all, it was Georges Dambier’s ability to put his subjects at ease (many of them were friends) that helped him create true, intimate and lasting images. With his delicate style, and refined technique, his work revealed a reality of great elegance. As his career blossomed, he became widely known for his ability to capture the essence of feminine chic and glamour in his images.

In 1954, Robert Capa asked him to lead a fashion department at the Magnum Photo Agency. Unfortunately, Capa died a few weeks later, while covering the Indochinese war.

Meanwhile, Georges Dambier set up his own studio in Paris, Rue de la Bienfaisance. As a freelance photographer, he continued to contribute to ELLE and other magazines: Vogue, Le Jardin des Modes, Marie France…He also collaborated with Françoise Giroud and Christine Collanges at L’Express. Big advertising campaigns (Synergie, Havas, Publicis), and contracts for many brands such as L’Oréal, Carita, Jacques Dessange followed.

In addition to his work in advertising, Georges Dambier did portraits for record covers and posters for his great friend, the producer Eddie Barclay and Jacques Canetti. As his reputation grew, so did opportunities to meet and photograph celebrities from different worlds. He captured the faces of the most notable artists of the 60’s: Sacha Distel, Zizi Jeanmaire, Dalida, Jeanne Moreau… His impressive client list included celebrities (Cerdan, Cocteau…), singers (Johnny Hallyday, Sylvie Vartan, Charles Aznavour…), actors (Alain Delon, Françoise Dorléac, Catherine Deneuve…) and many others.

In 1964, Georges Dambier launched his own project: a magazine for young people, dedicated to culture and fashion: TWENTY. He hired young artists and photographers: Just Jaeckin, Jean Paul Goude, Philippe Labro, Copi, Bosc and many others who would later become famous in their own right. Twenty lasted two eventful years.

In 1976, he created the magazine VSD with his old friend Maurice Siegel. Georges Dambier led the artistic side of the magazine and headed the photographic section. VSD was an instant success.

In the late eighties, Georges Dambier retired to a quieter life in the countryside.


This show runs through June 8, 2013

Peter Fetterman Gallery is located at BERGAMOT STATION .  GALLERY A7 .

2525 MICHIGAN AVE . SANTA MONICA, CA 90404 .

Phone: 310 453 6463

PETER@PETERFETTERMAN.COM

 

By Jim McKinniss

Veronica Bronzetti – new book

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 7, 2013
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copyright by Veronica Bronzetti

On June 8,2012 I made a post about Italian photographer Veronica Bronzetti. I have followed Veronica’s work with a lot of interest since then both through her website and through her postings on Facebook.

It is a fact of life that photography has entered a marvelous new era with digital photographs. Besides the traditional photographic print we now  have a new virtual world in which to consume photos. The digital revolution has also made it possible for anyone to create their own hard copy books.

Veronica has published a new book of her work that  you can  see by clicking  the link below.

I have to confess that I do not read Italian so I’ve been limited to looking at her photos. No doubt the words written by Sergio Gabriele are a key to understanding Veronica and her work.

Here is the link to her book:

http://issuu.com/migranze/docs/veronica_bronzetti_sergio_gabriele_self

This link takes you to her website:

http://www.veronicabronzetti.com/

By Jim McKinniss

Max MacKenzie, “American Ruins” and Jody Zellen, “Transitions” at dnj Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 2, 2013
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Photo copyright by Max MacKenzie.

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Photo copyright by Max MacKenzie.

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Photo copyright by Max MacKenzie.

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Photo copyright by Jody Zellen.

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Photo copyright by Jody Zellen.

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Photo copyright by Jody Zellen.

dnj Gallery is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibitions of “American Ruins” by Max MacKenzie and “Transitions” by Jody Zellen. 

In “American Ruins,” MacKenzie pays homage to his Midwestern roots with photographs from three different series, “Abandonings,” “American Ruins” and “Markings.” “Abandonings” marks MacKenzie’s return to Minnesota, the land of his youth, to capture the empty structures that recall the struggles of previous generations. He writes, “To me, this landscape and these buildings – sad, empty, silent houses and falling-down barns – possess a profound beauty not merely for their spare, simple designs and weathered boards, but as monuments to the men and women who, like my own ancestors, made long journeys and endured great hardships to reach this remote part of America and build in it a new home.” In “American Ruins,” MacKenzie ventures into other nearby states, which gives a specific focus on mood (while using a black and white format). Finally, in “Markings,” MacKenzie continues to consider the region but from an aerochute high in the sky. He concentrates on the sinuous lines and remarkable patterns embedded in the land, further emphasizing the beauty inherent in the area.

MacKenzie holds a B.A. in architecture and photography from Bennington College and studied atthe Corcoran Gallery School of Art. His commercial photography has been featured in thousands of brochures, books and magazines and he has received grants for his fine art projects from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts and the D.C. Commission on the Arts. His photographs are in numerous private, corporate and institutional collections. He is the author of three fine art books and teaches photography workshops and master classes.

“Transitions” in Gallery II features a combination of images selected from over twenty years of Zellen’s work in Southern California. Zellen embraces a multimedia format and has created a wide variety of collages that incorporate photography and drawing. Grids feature prominently in her work, reflecting the ordering principles of both newspapers and cities. “Transitions” follows her long-standing interests in media culture and urban landscapes.

Zellen earned a B.A. from Wesleyan University, an M.F.A. from the California Institute of the Arts and an M.P.S. from New York University. She has received numerous public art commissions, residencies and grants, most recently from the California Community Foundation Fellowship. Her work has been exhibited and reviewed widely in California and has been included in exhibitions across the country and internationally. Zellen is also an independent writer and curator based in Los Angeles. As an extension of her earlier work in web-based art, animation and artist’s books, she is currently working on iPhone and iPad apps that combine her drawings, animations and digital images.

SHOW DATES: April 20 – June 1, 2013

RECEPTION: Saturday, April 20, 6 – 8 pm

GALLERY HOURS: Tuesday – Saturday, 11 am – 6 pm

 

For more information or images, please contact Cambra Sklarz at cambra@dnjgallery.net.

dnj Gallery 2525 Michigan Avenue, suite J1, Santa Nonica, ca 90404 (310) 315-3551 http://www.dnjgallery.net

By Jim McKinniss