SoCal PhotoExchange

Jan Kraft

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 28, 2013

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Image copyright by Jan Kraft and Jim McKinniss

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Image copyright by Jan Kraft and Jim McKinniss

Jan Kraft is a Norwegian photographer who I know through Facebook. Jan is an amazingly talented and creative photographer and digital artist.

I’ve never posted a video on this blog before. However, I want to introduce Jan to the readers of this blog. The video is about 8 minutes. Take time to watch it. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lX1u4W9CdSo

 

By Jim McKinniss

 

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Isabel Munoz at Duncan Miller

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 22, 2013
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Photo copyright by Isabel Munoz

 

Isabel Munoz has captured form and movement, whether in flamenco, tango, ballet or in many forms of tribal dance and rituals in her travels throughout the world. This exhibition is a survey of this body language, sought from her exploration of rites and identity. This is her first gallery exhibition in Los Angeles.

Isabel Munoz (born 1951, in Barcelona) is a Spanish photographer who lives in Madrid.

Her black-and-white photos are a study of people through pieces of the human body or pictures of toreros, dancers or warriors, by often using a handmade and meticulous process of platinum printing.

Her works are in the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art, in New York, the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston and in many private collections.

This show runs through April 27, 2013

Duncan Miller is located in Bergamot Station

2525 Michigan Avenue, Unit A7, Santa Monica, CA 90404

Phone: 310 838 2440         

info@duncanmillergallery.com

 

By Jim McKinniss

Emma Powell

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 18, 2013

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The Storm copyright by Emma Powell.

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Dusk copyright by Emma Powell.

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Doubt copyright by Emma Powell.

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Oblivion copyright by Emma Powell.

 

There is a brief but interesting article in LENSCRATCH that talks about the photos of Emma Powell and puts some light on the subject of judging photos.

Here  is the link to the LENSCRATCH home page: http://www.lenscratch.com/

Follow this link to the LENSCRATCH article and Emma’s work.

http://www.lenscratch.com/search?q=emma+powell

 

 

By Jim McKinniss

Bob Willoughby – On Set at Fahey/Klein gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 7, 2013
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Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby.

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Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby.

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Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby.

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Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby.

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Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby.

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Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby.

Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby

Photo copyright by Bob Willoughby

The following text is from the press release for this show. Unfortunately I only recently became aware of the show which closed in January, 2013. The show consisted of 55 prints and you can probably still view many of these prints at Fahey/Klien.

The Fahey/Klein Gallery is pleased to present “On Set,” an exhibition of classic Hollywood photographer Bob Willoughby, who is widely considered to be the first “Hollywood Special” photographer— the first “outside” photographer to be hired by the studios to document the filming of a motion picture for the major magazines and publications of the time, such as Look and Life. Working alongside legendary filmmakers and iconic Hollywood actors, Willoughby created lasting images that captured behind the scenes moments that define the very essence of the golden era of motion picture history. Willoughby’s photographs are intimate exposures from such renowned Hollywood classics as A Star Is Born, Rebel Without a Cause, My Fair Lady, The Graduate, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and Rosemary’s Baby.

Willoughby honed his skills by pouring over old magazines in secondhand shops at night, cutting out and studying favorite images of Hollywood stars. He began training his eye, and developed his own distinct and authentic style of photographing “on set”. Working behind the camera with filmmakers, he developed innovative devices such as the radio controlled camera, and the sound-reducing blimp camera, which allowed him to work quietly and unobstructed on set. He caught intimate and revealing moments between directors and actors on and off the set, as well as dramatic action shots during filming. Being unobtrusive and blending in with the cast and crew, he was able to capture elusive moments of genuine emotion and authenticity on set.

Sydney Pollack, director, They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, recounts working alongside Willoughby and his unique ability to truly understand the story and essence of each of the films Willoughby worked on. “Sometimes a filmmaker gets a look at a photograph taken on his own set and sees the ‘soul’ of his film in one still photograph. It’s rare, but it happens. It happened to me in 1969, the first time I looked at the work of Bob Willoughby during the filming of They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?…From Willoughby, I truly learned something about the telling of my own film. He is a true visual stylist, one who understands how to communicate the most complicated ideas in the simplest, most arresting form.” (Sydney Pollack, Foreword to “The Star Makers”)

The exhibition also showcases a small selection of coveted jazz photographs from Bob Willoughby’s early career, documenting the California Jazz scene during the pivotal 1950s. Himself a great appreciator of jazz, Willoughby would often drop everything to photograph a live performance he heard on local radio, as well as exclusive recording sessions by the likes of Chet Baker.

For a period of over twenty years, Willoughby’s photographs were never out of print, gracing the covers and editorial articles of countless magazines and newspapers. Willoughby’s work has been exhibited and collected by The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Hollywood; The National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; The National Portrait Gallery, London; The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Film Department; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, among others. In December 2009, Bob Willoughby passed away at his home in Vence in the South of France, at the age of 82.

The Fahey/Klein Gallery is located at 148 North La Brea, between First Street and Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles, CA 90036

Hours: 10:00 am to 6:00 pm Tuesday through Saturday

Phone: (323) 934-2250

By Jim McKinniss

Mike Brodie – A PERIOD OF JUVENILE PROSPERITY at M+B Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 3, 2013

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Photo copyright by Mike Brodie.

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Photo copyright by Mike Brodie.

 

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Photo copyright by Mike Brodie.

 

M+B is proud to present Mike Brodie’s highly anticipated second solo exhibition, A Period of Juvenile Prosperity. The exhibition of thirty new color photographs will be Brodie’s first solo exhibition in six years and opens in conjunction with the publication of Brodie’s first monograph bearing the same name, published by Twin Palms. The exhibition will be shown simultaneously in New York at Yossi Milo Gallery and run at M+B in Los Angeles from March 16 through May 11, 2013, with an opening reception and book signing on Saturday, March 16 from 6 to 8 pm.

For three intense and prolific years, Brodie crisscrossed the states hopping trains, hitchhiking and employing whatever freely available means to fuel his burning lust for movement. The resulting photographs weave a telling photo narrative relatable to Kerouac’s On The Road, capturing the raw spirit of adventure and unbridled freedom Brodie and his friends sought and lived. A natural, Brodie’s camera functioned as an extension of himself, an obsession. There was no thought-out intention to document or record, the resulting images just happened after Brodie found a Polaroid SX-70 on the backseat of a friend’s car. Soulfully and intimately depicted against a constant backdrop of movement are savages “riding suicide,” maps in filthy hands, tender moments of slumber and ruddy faces framed by wind-whipped hair eagerly leaning into the next adventure. Brodie’s tightly knit traveling community was bound by movement, ravenous for life’s varied experiences and interactions and fueled by an intense curiosity to see, to feel, to meet something and someone beyond the towns in which they had been raised. Living outside of society’s norms, this highly creative group lived neither on nor off, but parallel to the beaten path, gleaning society’s detritus along the way to support their chosen version of the American Dream.

The photographs also document a period of transition in Brodie’s life—just after puberty and just before manhood— when hitchhiking for the thrill of the open road, catching rides on freight trains bound for another nowhere town, eating the food left to rot by others and drinking the cheapest alcohol that crosses your lips seems like a perfectly logical and honest way to spend your days. Brodie’s tableau repurposes symbols of decline—trains, Polariods, 35mm film, thrift store clothes—into a seemingly alluring form of ad hoc glamour and freedom tinged with punk rock idealism. The characters drift through post-industrial America. The result: a balance of comeliness and crustiness, filth and beauty, all finely measured by movement, a desire to move on and, at some point, move out of the picture. Although Brodie was never trained, his photographs are an honest and sincere look at the practice of photography that can only come from historical unawareness of the medium. Unknowingly, Brodie’s images follow in the footsteps of photographers like Robert Frank, William Eggleston, Walker Evans and Nan Goldin.
 

Born in 1985, Brodie was raised between Phoenix and Pensacola along with his younger brother, Jake, by a single working mother. Perhaps one might assume Brodie had little to lose when he hopped his first train at seventeen, but Brodie wasn’t escaping, he was searching. Since that first train ride, Brodie has ridden over 50,000 miles through forty-six states, documenting the people and places he encountered along the way. From 2004 to 2006, Brodie shot exclusively on SX-70 Time-Zero film, earning him the moniker the Polaroid Kidd: a name he would tag on boxcars and walls. When Time-Zero film was discontinued, Brodie moved from these carefully framed gems to more candid moments shooting with a 1980 Nikon F3 with 35mm film from 2006 to 2009. The immediacy of the photographic medium combined with Brodie’s innocence of spirit and raw approach provides a distinct style and authentic voice within the lexicon of photographic history that is so uniquely his own, while simultaneously characteristically American.
 

Mike Brodie won the Baum Award for Emerging American Photographers in 2007 and has been included in exhibitions at the DeCordova Museum (Lincoln, MA) and the Sonoma State University Art Gallery (Sonoma, CA). Brodie’s work is held in the permanent collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Berkeley Museum of Art. Brodie’s first exhibition in 2006 at M+B garnered critical attention, and his work went on to be reviewed in The New York TimesThe New Yorker, American PHOTO, pdn and others. One never to gravitate towards attention, as soon as Brodie began gaining fame for his images, he retreated into obscurity, focusing his obsession on becoming a diesel mechanic: a job that he currently pursues in Oakland with the same passion he approached to image-making.

 

Exhibition dates: 16 MAR – 11 MAY 2013

ARTIST’S OPENING RECEPTION AND BOOK SIGNING: SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 6-8PM

M+B Gallery 612 North Almont Drive
Los Angeles, California 90069

 

For more information, please contact Alexandra Wetzel at M+B at (310) 550-0050 or alexandra@mbart.com

 

 

By Jim McKinniss

Connie Samaras exhibition at Armory Center for the Arts in Passadena

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 2, 2013

 

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Minuteman Missile over LA Skies, 1998 copyright by Connie Samaras

 

Over the past two decades, Connie Samaras has used photography and video to represent particular built environments she characterizes as “speculative landscapes” against the backdrop of daily life. She explores the aspirations and anxieties of the imagined future – how the US dreams itself – along with the psychological and social dislocation within the everyday. 

Samaras reveals the paradoxes of these surreal environments – vast, impersonal constructions such as the cities of Las Vegas and Dubai and the remote, scientific colonies of the South Pole or Spaceport America, an emerging corporate space launch facility in the remote desert of New Mexico. Her objective is to unhinge the speculative from the normative and thus illuminate the multiple timelines and social possibilities – the rich subjectivity – in any given moment of daily life. Works from six completed series will be presented – Angelic States-Event Sequence, After the American Century, V.A.L.I.S. (Vast Action Living Intelligence System), and Spaceport America – as well as works from the ongoing series Surface Events. Collectively, the works inTales of Tomorrow address the social and economic construction of “future imaginaries” and the variable membrane between fiction and real world. 

In addition to featuring works from the six series noted above, this survey exhibition debuts Edge of Twilight, new photography from the first part of an expansive trilogy that launches a conceptual turn in Samaras’ work. Historically the artist’s projects, such as those shot in Dubai and South Pole, depict the future imaginaries of global capitalism, or how the future is held out as a singular probability. Edge of Twilight looks at humble and everyday future imaginaries inflected by social change movements, in which the future is seen as a series of shifting possibilities. Featuring photographs of homes in a women’s retirement RV park in the desert of the U.S. southwest, Edge of Twilight borrows from the genres of time travel and tourism literature as way to reconsider the intersecting complexity of marginalized, cross-generational personal experience and political histories. The long exposures of the photographs and the vapor light under which they were shot create an enigmatic environment in which black skies and yellow RVs are punctuated by the vivid colors of rainbow flags. 

Tales of Tomorrow is the largest and most significant exhibition of Connie Samaras’ work to date. The exhibition is accompanied by a full-color, 108-page, hard-cover catalogue edited and with an introduction by exhibition curator Irene Tsatsos and texts by Charlotte Cotton, Lisa E. Bloom, Juli Carson, Ken Gonzalez-Day, Alice Echols, Kate Flint, Julie Lazar, Catherine Opie, Kavita Philip, Claire Phillips, Anna Joy Springer, Tyler Stallings, Roberto Tejada, and Matias Viegener. The catalogue was designed by Lorraine Wild of Green Dragon Office and is being distributed by D.A.P. The exhibition and publication have been supported by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Pasadena Art Alliance. In addition, the artist received support from Creative Capital for the production of Edge of Twilight.

About the Artist
Connie Samaras was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1950. She has exhibited for over twenty-five years, mounting solo shows at venues such as the California Museum of Photography, the San Francisco Art Institute, Detroit Art Institute, School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, and Franklin Furnace. A full professor at University of California/Irvine, Samaras has received more than four-dozen research and production grants from foundations such as the California Community Foundation, the National Science Foundation, Anonymous Was A Woman, Art Matters, Banff, and the National Endowment for the Arts. In addition to an extensive record of exhibitions and lectures, Samaras has published feminist critiques of the culture wars in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s (New Art ExaminerArtForumNew York Law School Review); edited texts on technology and the cultural production of death (Terminals); and written experimental fiction (WhitewallsCentral Park) and critical narrative (The Scholar and the Feminist OnlineRemix: Santiago Bose).

Armory Center for the Arts

145 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena CA

Exhibition Dates
3/1/2013 to 6/9/2013

 

By Jim McKinniss