The Photo Exchange

Photo Independent in Hollywood, CA

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 24, 2014
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Red Moscow copyright by Katerina Belkins

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W.O.F. copyright by Christopher Colville.

 

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Photo Copyright by Bob Francis.

PHOTO INDEPENDENT is an annual photography art fair held in Hollywood, California, making its inaugural debut at Raleigh Studios, across from Paramount Studios, in 2014. As the first and only high-visibility platform for independent photographers, PHOTO INDEPENDENT presents a forum for direct exchange of ideas and contacts between photographers, collectors and art professionals. PHOTO INDEPENDENT provides you with the unique opportunity to invest in the most exciting established, emerging and undiscovered photographic talent today.

 Andy Summers, Sting’s old band mate, is doing a special exhibition called Mysterious Barricades, 2014

Raleigh Studios, Hollywood
5300 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood, CA 90038

Friday, April 25
Trade Day, 1pm-5pm
Press Preview, 5pm-7pm
Opening Night Premiere Party, 7-10pm

Saturday, April 26, 11am–7pm
Sunday, April 27, 11am–6pm

By Jim McKinniss

Paris Photo Los Angeles

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 23, 2014

Paris Photo Los Angeles, the US edition of the world’s most celebrated art fair for works created in the photographic medium, will take place at Paramount Pictures Studios April 25th-27th offering the ideal setting to explore how artists have been and are using photography and moving image in their work in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Leading international galleries will present historical and contemporary bodies of works by renowned and emerging artists in the legendary Paramount Pictures’ soundstages. The New York Street Backlot, the one-of-a-kind replica of New York City’s streets, will be dedicated to the presentation of cutting-edge solo shows, Young Gallery exhibitions, and bookseller projects, each exhibiting within an exclusive movie set.

The public program is also an important component of the fair. Built around cultural events involving artists, art world professionals, collectors, and cultural institutions, this year’s program will include special exhibitions and the Sound & Vision series of conversations and screenings.

Join us for this highly anticipated major event.


Read more at http://www.parisphoto.com/losangeles/about#QolvjpmSEJrcmX0r.99

 

By Jim McKinniss

Vermont Avenue, 1998 at dnj Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 12, 2014
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Photo copyright by Pamela Mayers-Schoenberg

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Photo copyright by Pamela Mayers-Schoenberg.

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Photo copyright by Pamela Mayers-Schoenberg.

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Photo copyright by Pamela Mayers-Schoenberg.

 

dnj Gallery will be presenting the work of Pamela Mayers-Schoenberg from her project called Vermont Avenue, 1998.

Here is what Pamela says about this project.

Vermont Avenue runs for thirty miles through Los Angeles, from Griffith Park, through Los Feliz, Hollywood, Koreatown, and South Central, to the harbor. It serves by the Observatory, the Greek Theater, Los Angeles City College, USC, and the Coliseum, but I prefer to focus on the smaller entities of the street: homes, shops, schools, clubs, parks, and markets, and the people.

It is one, single community, made up of independent, yet interconnecting parts. Los Angeles is, and has always been, a great melting-pot. Through my images, I want to build a collective vision and create an interaction among the various neighborhoods.

 

To see more of Pamela’s work visit her website: http://www.mayers-schoenberg.com/

 

This exhibition runs May 3 through May 31, 2014

dnj gallery
2525 Michigan Avenue, Suite J1
Santa Monica, California 90404
310.315.3551
office@dnjgallery.net

 

By Jim McKinniss

Photographer David Morris Cunningham

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 4, 2014

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Stone copyright by David Morris Cunningham

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Maple Seed copyright by David Morris Cunningham

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American Enso copyright by David Morris Cunningham

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Diagonal Lines copyright by David Morris Cunningham

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Rice Paper and Bamboo #2 copyright by David Morris Cunningham

 

I have been watching David Morris Cunningham’s photographic journey for several years. David shows a clarity of vision and artistic sensibility that I admire.

David’s favorite quote is from  Matsuo Basho: ‘The haiku that reveals seventy to eighty percent is good. Those that reveal fifty or sixty percent, we never tire of.’ 

Here is what David has to say about his photography:

My journey through the haiku lens began in February, 2008 while participating in the workshop, ‘Zen and the Art of Photography.’ It was a journey I had sensed coming but had no idea the breadth it would entail. Sprinkled throughout my early work were clues as to the direction I would someday travel, but it was during that week in Santa Fe that I became aware of the path I was to walk. A path so simple the challenge seemed (and still seems) daunting.

During the months that followed the workshop, belief systems were tested, transformed, abandoned and sown. Thoughts and ideas slowly coalesced. A new understanding began to emerge.

The notion of using my camera to make a visual haiku quietly found its way to the edge of my awareness. The idea excited me. Instead of making a picture speak a thousand words, I would work to make an image whisper seventeen syllables.

 

Stone
Made in 2008 at the Zen and the Art of Photography workshop in Santa Fe, I consider this image to be the image that began my journey through The Haiku Lens. During the workshop I consciously began to strip away the extraneous within the frame that I felt were distractions to rather than elements of the photograph.

Maple Seed
I made this image while working on a project where I forced myself to notice of the moments of beauty at my feet. It was a photograph I made several years ago but didn’t process until somewhat recently. These images are usually windows into my future; a part of a body of work that I didn’t realize I was working on when I initially pressed the shutter release.

American Enso
I’ve always been a huge fan of abstract painting and photography. With this image I entered a more abstract phase of my work; the first photograph that successfully bridged the gap between the more realistic and the abstract. By making an image of a tangible object in such a way that the photograph becomes somewhat mysterious slightly altered my way of seeing and recording the world around me.

Diagonals
Another subject that has always interested me is the play between shadow and light and geometry. Diagonals is a photograph that serves as another bridge in my evolving process, stripping away the subject and synthesizing the image down to the elements of light, shadow and geometry.

Rice Paper and Bamboo #2
This image belongs to my latest body of work. The series consists of photographs made using a rice paper shade as the canvas for my further study of the interplay between shadow and light; creating a piece of work that contains several “windows”, each one working alone and as a collective whole.

DAVID MORRIS CUNNINGHAM

PO Box 1426
Woodstock, NY 12498
website: thehaikulens.com
email: dmc@thehaikulens.com

 

By Jim McKinniss

William Wegman photographs dogs

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on April 2, 2014

375px-William_Wegman's_Mother_Goose_Trailer

 

Here is a short YouTube video of renowned artist, William Wegman, most widely known as ‘The Dog Photographer’ talks art and dogs. With cameos by his famous Weimeraners.

 

By Jim McKinniss

Hannah Whitaker – COLD WAVE at M+B Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 26, 2014

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Portrait with sweater (green) copyright by Hannah Whitaker.

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Purple Paper copyright by Hannah Whitaker.

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Eye (Bromberg) copyright by Hannah Whitaker.

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Torso copyright by Hannah Whitaker.

 

Hannah Whitaker’s Cold Wave work is showing at M+B Gallery in her first solo exhibition in Los Angeles.  

This show expands on Whitaker’s interest in the Austrian logician Kurt Gödel who introduced the notion of unknowability to mathematics, a field often characterized by certainty. His ideas problematized early 20th century philosophical claims to truth and knowledge, a dialectic inherent to the medium of photography. Whitaker’s interest in Gödel led her to think of the film plane as a formal system—a set of limited variables and operations. The results establish repetitious motifs that occur both within a single image and across multiple photographs.

 

Employing a 4×5 view camera, she photographs using the intervention of hand-cut paper screens, often layering as many as fifteen in a single image; at times shooting through the screens and at others using them to deform an image selectively after it is shot. These in-camera processes allow her to collapse various moments in time and space onto a single sheet of film. The resulting photographs are suspended between multiple dualities: the handmade and the technical, the geometric and the photographic, the flat and dimensional, or—in the lexicon of Rosalind Krauss—the antireal and the real.

 

The notion of a formal system is reinforced by her use of the constitute parts of her process as subjects in their own photographs. In Cutouts (Green), Cutouts (Pink) andCutouts (Orange), Whitaker photographed the paper detritus left behind after cutting her paper screens. She arranged these cutouts on colored paper backgrounds that reappear in different forms in other photographs, establishing material linkages across multiple works. While the photographs contain abstract elements, Whitaker’s subjects can be thought of as resolutely depictive in their familiarity—wintery landscapes, women and still lifes of banal objects. These conventional subjects are thoroughly recognizable, despite gaps in their representation. In Torso, for example, a body remains a body despite its distortions.

 

Many of the screens draw from 20th century abstract artists, such as Sophie Taeuber-Arp, David Bomberg and Anni Albers, in addition to applied artists such as quiltmakers Annie and Mary Lee Bendolph. Whitaker’s patterns employ illusory logic that is undermined by the messiness of photographic depiction, the imperfections in the paper itself and—at times—the pattern’s refusal to adhere completely to its own rules.  

 

Hannah Whitaker (b. 1980) received her BA from Yale University (2002) and MFA from ICP/Bard (2006).  Recent exhibitions include solo shows at Galerie Christophe Gaillard (Paris), Thierry Goldberg (New York), Locust Projects (Miami) and Rencontres d’Arles in France, where she was nominated for the Discovery Prize, along with group shows at Cherry and Martin (Los Angeles) and Higher Pictures (New York). She recently co-edited Issue 45 of Blind Spot magazine and co-curated its accompanying show at Invisible Exports in New York. She is a contributing editor for Triple Canopy, an editorial group included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial.  Whitaker lives and works in Brooklyn.

 

This show runs through April 26, 2014

M+B is located at 612 North Almont Drive
Los Angeles, California 90069
Phone: 310 550 0050
Email:  info [at] mbart.com

Hours: Tuesday – Saturday, 10AM – 6PM

 

By Jim McKinniss

Photographer Edward Mapplethorpe

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 24, 2014

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Photo copyright by Edward Mapplethorpe.

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Photo copyright by Edward Mapplethorpe.

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Photo copyright by Edward Mapplethorpe.

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Photo copyright by Edward Mapplethorpe.

 

 

Most photographers know the name Robert Mapplethorpe but few know that his younger brother, Edward. 

The following text is from Edward’s website: http://edwardmapplethorpe.com/

 

Born and raised in New York, Edward Mapplethorpe began his solo career in 1990 under the pseudonym Edward Maxey and was quickly acclaimed for his luminous nudes, portraits, and still lives that were evocative of his older brother, Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989). However, it was his innovative work beyond the controlled environment of the studio (Undercurrents, 1992-94) that first distinguished him as a unique talent in bridging the gap between photography and abstract painting.

Mapplethorpe continued to incorporate a painterly aesthetic in a number of subsequent thematic projects including: Stars and Stripes (1994),Transmographs (2000), Compositions (2002) and HAIR Transfer(2004). In 2004, Mr. Mapplethorpe collaborated with New York City based orchestra EOS and produced a limited edition portfolio of images capturing musicians in a whirlwind of movement as they performed selected pieces from their repertoire. This adaptation of the cageian concept of integrating chance and time into the creative process became another integral aspect of Mapplethorpe’s own artistic practice.

All the while, Mapplethorpe had been photographing one-year-old babies. This subject is a versatile means for him to explore the human spirit through fresh and unguarded expressions. Promoted in House and Garden Magazine as one of the top commissioned photographers of baby portraits, the magazine compares him to his older sibling with whom Edward worked closely for many years. The artist has affirmed that assisting his brother has greatly contributed to the development of the distinct and pure quality of these photographs.

In 2002 Mapplethorpe stepped away from photography for the first time to create dynamic, abstract drawings on paper. They are a continuation of the artist’s exploration of compositional space and abstractions of portraiture using charcoal, ink, watercolor and pencil.

Shiseido la Beauté organized the solo exhibition HAIR Transfer in 2004, marking Mapplethorpe’s first use of hair as a medium. In 2007, a solo exhibition of TimeLines at Foley Gallery, New York proved to be a watershed moment for the artist. Mapplethorpe returned to his formal exploration of line by combining the gestural impulses of action painting with non-camera photographic techniques. His use of human and animal hair to “draw” his compositions allowed for a complex play between control and randomness that continues to structure and temper his work to the present. This show traveled in 2008 to Germany and was exhibited at artMbassy, Berlin. Concurrently, Mapplethorpe exhibited a new body of work, TimeZones at Ketterer Kunst, Berlin. These two exhibitions, collectively titled TimeLines / TimeZones, traveled to Galleria Casagrande in Rome, Italy in April 2009.

In May 2011 Mapplethorpe exhibited The Variations at Foley Gallery, New York. This series continued to push the artist’s practice of harnessing darkroom techniques to create photo-based drawings that are at once organic yet highly technical in their creation. This exhibition traveled to Dubner Moderne in Lausanne, Switzerland in October 2011. The artist lives and works in New York.

 

By Jim McKinniss

Bootsy Holler

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 22, 2014

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Photo copyright by Bootsy Holler.

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Photo copyright by Bootsy Holler.

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Photo copyright by Bootsy Holler.

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Photo copyright by Bootsy Holler.

 

I met Bootsy at an event called “Six Shooters” at Venice Arts. The event showcased six female photographers. The event is part of Open Show Los Angeles that is co-produced by Jonas Yip and Dan Shepard.

Open Show Los Angeles provides a forum for our local community of visual storytellers to share their projects. Each month photographers, filmmakers and multimedia producers of L.A. gather at different venues around town for an evening of live presentations and lively conversations.

 

By Jim McKinniss

Portraits of the 20th Century at Peter Fetterman Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 16, 2014

 

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Malcolm X copyright by Eve Arnold.

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Carl Jung copyright by Yousuf Karsh.

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Albert Scheitzer copyright by Yousuf Karsh.

 

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Rosa Parks.

A collection of iconic and rarely seen portraits of visionaries, leaders, writers, actors, artists, musicians and notable personalities from the 20th Century. 

To look upon someone extraordinary, who has achieved greatness against great odds. To be moved by an image of one who has touched upon the lives of thousands. To seek knowledge and understanding. To find inspiration. 

These are the experiences we seek when confronted by a great portrait. The figures captured in this exhibition were extraordinary, exuding character and living lives of triumph and disaster. The photographers who captured their essence, by necessity required a technical prowess but more importantly possess depth, empathy and pursue a true understanding of the human condition. 

Portraits are certainly the great power in photography. They are the great confluence of documentary and artistry. Our natural voyeuristic condition draws us in and the medium allows us to feel an element of intimacy. A great portrait will explore the nuances of character and in some rare cases a portrait will truly capture an emotion. As viewers we are given license to share that feeling, to be drawn in, to be moved and to walk away inspired.

The Exhibition will include works by…

Berenice Abbott
Eve Arnold
Sid Avery
Lillian Bassman
Henri Cartier Bresson
Dan Budnik
Cornell Capa
Alfred Eisenstaedt
Elliott Erwitt
Martine Franck
Burt Glinn
Walter Iooss
Yousuf Karsh
Brian Lanker
Barry Lategan
Annie Leibovitz
Jacques Lowe
Arnold Newman
Irving Penn
Marc Riboud
Al Satterwhite
… and more.

This show runs March 15 – May 31, 2014

Peter Fetterman Gallery
2525 Michigan Avenue Gallery A1
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: 310 453 6463
Hours: Wednesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm 
and by appointment.
General Inquiries: 
info@peterfetterman.com

By Jim McKinniss

Sara Jane Boyers: Gridlock

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on March 12, 2014
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Photo copyright by Sara Jane Boyers.

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Photo copyright by Sara Jane Boyers.

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Photo copyright by Sara Jane Boyers

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Photo copyright by Sara Jane Boyers.

All of these photos and the following text appeared in the February 28, 2014 issue of Aline Smithson’s blog called LENSCRATCH.

Sara Jane Boyers’ new project, GRIDLOCK, reflects life behind the wheel in one our largest cities, Los Angeles. There is a good possibility that we might be sitting in traffic when we attend her opening at the Leica Gallery in Los Angeles on March 8th running through April 13th (opening March 8, 5-7pm).  But it we will use her philosophy of looking at bumper to bumper traffic with visual potential. Her continuing project is a series of photographs shot from her car window while stuck in traffic. Sara comments: “GRIDLOCK is about being a Californian. About being in a car. About traffic. I am photographing from my driver’s window, first with my viewfinder-less Leica D-Lux3, and now the D-Lux5. Stopped. Crawling. Trapped. Riding on the clutch as I stay in 1st should the flow move on. Hoping to catch that elusive abstraction even while those behind me glower and gently nudge my car along.”  The exhibition also includes the work of Domenico Foschi and Sol Hill.

Sara Jane is California fine art photographer who, after successful careers in the music and publishing industries, has returned to a serious focus on her photography. She has exhibited at the Craig Krull Gallery and her has been included in museums, galleries and photo festivals including a GETTY PST exhibition at the Vincent Price Art Museum; Western Australia’s FOTOFREO Biennial; DESIGN/REACTION at the Pasadena Museum of California of Art; as well as two MOPLA exhibitions, the second organized and co-curated by Boyers; and SUMMER MIX, also co-curated by Boyers for LACMA’s Wallis Annenberg Photography Department. She is the recipient of two 2011 and four 2012 IPA Honorable Mentions for her work.

GRIDLOCK

This is a project I cannot say that I looked for. Rather, it is about being immobilized, involuntarily confined and not in control; stuck in the all too commonplace bane of modern metropolitan life: traffic that seems to have no beginning, no end, and is incomprehensible as to its life-cycle.

The unsought and unseen has always fascinated me and that is what I face in this world within our freeways and by-ways, not only in Los Angeles but especially here. Stopped in this place of presumed mobility, taking photographs transported me from confinement to freedom, at least in creative vision if not movement.

You can view Sara’s work at the Leica Gallery Los Angeles

8783 Beverly Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90048

By Jim McKinniss

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