The Photo Exchange

2012 in review

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on December 31, 2012

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 52,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 12 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

Richard Kraft – Eye Words at Charlie James Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on December 29, 2012

 

Tube portrait #33 copyright by Richard Kraft.

Tube portrait #33 copyright by Richard Kraft.

Tube portrait #31 copyright by Richard Kraft.

Tube portrait #31 copyright by Richard Kraft.

 

Tube portrait #20 copyright by Richard Kraft.

Tube portrait #20 copyright by Richard Kraft.

 

Charlie James Gallery is delighted to present Eyes Words, our second solo show of photographs and collage by LA artist Richard Kraft. A visual work in three movements, Eyes Words consists of two iterations of Kraft’s Tube Portraits—one a series of large-scale photographic prints, the other a collection of one hundred miniature photographic images. These two rooms are separated by an installation of collages and drawings that are composed entirely of language. Separately and in relationship to one another, these three elements probe the tensions between the known and the unknown, meaning and the inscrutable while creating a different kind of space of the imagination and the interior mind.

Inspired by Walker Evans’s Many Are Called, the Tube Portraits are black-and-white photographic stills from video taken surreptitiously of travelers on the London Underground. Kraft selects and re-photographs split-second moments during which each subject seems to reveal something private and naked in this very public space. He shifts color to black-and-white, then crops tightly on each face, almost eliminating the physical world in which they exist. Many of the faces simply float in a deep void of black or a haze of gray, which upon closer inspection start to dissolve into interlaced lines – the face as screen.

In the first room seven large Tube Portraits are presented, each nearly four feet high. Creating a cathedral-like atmosphere, the portraits convey a kind of emotional infinity, each seemingly a window into the complexity of a human life. The presentation in the main gallery is in explicit contrast to the basement installation, where a grid of one hundred tiny tube portraits will be presented. From a distance this piece is an abstract composition of grays and blacks against a white background, but closer inspection reveals multiple series of images (some depicting the same subjects as in the upstairs gallery) each printed in the form of a postage stamp from an undeclared country.

Between these two installations the rear gallery installation serves as an interlude of sorts. In this chamber Kraft presents a number of monumental text pieces, one of which, entitled Ulysses, is a 5 x 8 foot collage in which every page of James Joyce’s text has been cut up and reassembled. In two twinned large scale drawings Kraft reinterprets Franz Kafka’s famous Letter to his Father. Just as the “Tube Portraits” radiate the tension between what we can see with our own eyes, what we may never know, and what we might possibly imagine, these works—though composed only of words—ask the viewer to ponder the space between meaning and its absence.

Richard Kraft grew up in London and lives in Los Angeles. Kraft earned his BFA at Parsons School of Design and his MFA at the University of Michigan. His work has been exhibited in galleries such as L.A. Louver, Rosamund Felsen, Greg Kucera and non-profit spaces including the Portland Art Museum, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, the Photographic Resource Center, among others. He has frequently used public spaces for installations with work appearing on the sides of buses and in library aisles, as well for performances such as at Oxford Circus in London and along the full length of Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles. In the summer of 2009, he conducted a series of performances at Speakers’ Corner in London and at several rural sites in Scotland and Northern England. Most recently he has embarked on a series of walking performances (for anywhere from one to one hundred walkers). Walks have already taken place in cities such as Los Angeles and Las Vegas, and remote locations such as Death Valley and the Wendover Airfield in Wendover, Utah. Siglio Press will publish an artist’s monograph in 2013. Siglio has already released six multiples (100 Soldiers for a Revolution, Untitled: Kapitan Kloss, Two Tube Portraits, R.S. A Library Portrait, Conturbatio: A Selection and Study for Ulysses/Let’s Look Around ).

This show runs December 15, 2012 through February 2, 2013.

Kraft has a solo exhibition in the fall of 2013 at the Laguna Art Museum.

CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY

 969 CHUNG KING ROAD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90012 

 Phone: 213.687.0844 

The gallery is open WED – SAT, 12 – 6 PM

By Jim McKinniss

Photographers I know

Posted in Photographers, Photography by Jim McKinniss on December 24, 2012
Photo copyright by Aimee Becker

Photo copyright by Aimee Becker

Photo copyright by Jo Ann Craig.

Photo copyright by Jo Ann Craig.

Photo copyright by Veronica Bronzetti

Photo copyright by Veronica Bronzetti

Photo copyright by Olya Turcihin

Photo copyright by Olya Turcihin

Photo copyright by Marco Munoz

Photo copyright by Marco Munoz

Photo copyright by John Willems

Photo copyright by John Willems

Photo copyright by Ken Jackson

Photo copyright by Ken Jackson

Photo copyright by Tomer Weiss

Photo copyright by Tomer Weiss

I spend a good amount of time looking at photographs whether in books, museums, galleries or on-line. So naturally I’m frequently finding photos that cause me to take a closer look at the photographer’s work.

 The photos above were created by some of the photographers I know from my on-line journey through the photo world. I like their work and since I write this blog I’m showing it to you.

 

By Jim McKinniss

Jessica Eaton – Polytopes at M+B Gallery

Posted in Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by Jim McKinniss on December 22, 2012
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Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

8046_680

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

 

8094_680

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

 

 

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

8046_680

Photo copyright by Jessica Eaton

M+B is pleased to present Jessica Eaton’s first Los Angeles exhibition, Polytopes. Eaton’s latest work views the world through the capabilities of photography using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as color separation filtration, additive color theory, multiple exposures, motion blur, in-camera masking, cross polarization and lighting techniques. Building on her highly reviewed series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt (cfaal) with Polytopes Eaton develops more configurations from repeated fragments, constructing sculptural works on sheets of large format film. The haunting, luminescent images bloom and grow before the viewer, the result of layered time and additive color theory. Polytopes runs from November 3, 2012 through January 5, 2013, with an opening reception for the artist on Saturday, November 3 from 6 to 8 pm.
Eaton shapes her latest artistic output “in camera” through multiple exposures and the use of different colored filters. In two new works, cfaal 276 and cfaal 279 the tactile, present nature of the work is exemplified through lush details of textured wood grain and large brush strokes radiantly depicted under added colors, their reflections offering up an engaging dimensionality to the work. Bold, vibrant angels energetically cut across space in Eaton’s Tri/Colour/Angles work, the moment of potential, surprise and experimentation revealed at their aligning points. The use of the artist’s studio as laboratory further expands in Eaton’s Interpolation Dramatizations and RGB Weaves – the artist’s analogue take on a digital solution. Through multiple exposures Eaton uses blur and stepped exposures to symbolize the bicubic smoother or Nearest Neighbor – interpolations algorithms used by imaging softwares such as Photoshop. Eaton’s process and the fascinating result is a conversation with the world, navigating the forces of time and space the viewer is presented with a striking sense of possibility.
Jessica Eaton (b. 1977, Regina, Saskatchewan) holds a BFA in photography from the Emily Carr Institute in Vancouver, British Columbia. Her work focuses on the possibilities of the medium and is often experimental in nature. Jessica has been the recipient of the Grand Prix du Jury for the Hyères Fashion and Photography Festival 2012, Foam International Photography Magazine Talent Call 2012, the Bright Spark Award for the Magenta Foundation Flash Forward Emerging Photographers from the UK, Canada and USA 2011, “Hey, Hot Shot”, Jen Bekman Gallery, 2010 and was awarded a Canada Council for the Arts research and creation grant 2011. Eaton’s photographs have been published in numerous publications including Foam, Border Crossings, The British Journal of Photography (cover March 2012), ARTnews (cover image March 2011), BlackFlash, Colour Magazine, Pyramid Power, Hunter and Cook and Lay Flat 02: Meta. Jessica Eaton lives and works in Montréal. This is her first solo exhibition at M+B.

 For more info, please contact Alexandra Wetzel at M+B at (310) 550-0050 or alexandra@mbart.com.

M+B Gallery is located at 612 North Almont Drive, Los Angeles, California 90069

This exhibition runs through December 22, 2012

By Jim McKinniss

Dylan Vitone and Richard Gilles at dnj Gallery

Posted in Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography by Jim McKinniss on December 17, 2012

 

Photo copyright by Richard Gilles

Photo copyright by Richard Gilles

 

 

Photo copyright by Richard Gilles

Photo copyright by Richard Gilles

 

Photo copyright by Richard Gilles

Photo copyright by Richard Gilles

 

Photo copyright by Dylan Vitone

Photo copyright by Dylan Vitone

 

 

dnj Gallery is pleased to announce its upcoming exhibitions by gallery artists Dylan Vitone and Richard Gilles.  The main gallery will feature “Leisure” by Vitone.  Gallery II will display “Towers” by Gilles.  These are both artists’ third solo exhibitions at dnj Gallery.

 

“Leisure” includes work from Vitone’s “Yellowstone” and “Rutland” projects.  In “Yellowstone,” Vitone investigates modern society’s interaction with nature, capturing the throngs of tourists who flock to the historic park.  In contrast, in the “Rutland” project, Vitone explores less mainstream pursuits at Skatopia in southern Ohio.  Photographing the skate enthusiasts who camp there, Vitone looks beyond the tough exterior of youth counterculture to find an underlying beauty and naïveté.  Together, the projects form a dialogue about the role of leisure in American society.

 

As with his earlier series, Vitone stitches together several images to create a nearly 360-degree view, which, as he states, “allows [him] to show simultaneously details and relationships at multiple spacial and perceptual levels….”  “Working in the tradition of street photographers and social anthropologists such as Milton Rogovin and Bruce Davidson, Vitone makes extended portraits of communities through intimate observations of their everyday rituals.”  (Leah Ollman, Los Angeles Times, 10-24-08).

 

Vitone is an Associate Professor in the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University.  He holds a B.A. in Photo-communications from St. Edwards University and an M.F.A. in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art.  His work has been featured in solo and group exhibitions throughout the country and is in the permanent collections of many museums, including the George Eastman House, Rochester, New York and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

 

Gilles’ “Towers” series in Gallery II captures pairs of vertical structures set against stark panoramas with ample skies and low horizons.  He views the towers as “sentries standing watch over the landscape” and, with Google Maps to help him scout locations across the United States (including many in California and Nevada), is meticulous about adhering to the rigid formula of pairs.  “Towers” is a continuation of Gilles’ ongoing exploration of the unnoticed and overlooked, and is an invitation to consider both the condition of the terrain and the symbolism of the structures occupying it.

 

 

Gilles earned his B.A. in Fine Arts from San Francisco State University.  His work has been exhibited in California and throughout the country and is in the collections of the Southeast Museum of Photography, Daytona Beach, Florida and the University of California, Davis, Richard L. Nelson Gallery & Fine Arts Collection, Davis, California.

 

SHOW DATES:  January 12  – February 23, 2013

RECEPTION:  Saturday, January 12, 6 – 8 pm

GALLERY HOURS:  Tuesday – Saturday, 11 am – 6 pm

dnj Gallery 2525 michigan avenue, suite J1, santa monica, ca 90404  www.dnjgallery.net

For more information or images, please contact Cambra Sklarz at (310) 315-3551 or cambra@dnjgallery.net

 

By Jim McKinniss

Evolving Toward Ecstasy: Matisse Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Posted in Art Museums, Photograph Exhibits by Jim McKinniss on December 3, 2012

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The following text is an excerpt from the the New York Times. The entire story can be read at:

 nytimes.com/2012/11/30/arts/design/matisse-exhibition-at-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

 

The great French modernist Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was not a joiner. In the early 20th century he led the brief blitz of the Fauves — those “wild beasts” of fiery colors and blunt textures — but otherwise abstained from the signal movements of modern art.

 

He communed with artists of the distant or not-so-distant past, from Giotto to Cézanne, and periodically brushed shoulders with Cubism and the work of his chief rival, Picasso. But his main desire was, as he put it, to “push further and deeper into true painting.” This project was in every sense an excavation, and he achieved it partly by digging into his own work, revisiting certain scenes and subjects again and again and at times also making superficially similar if drastically divergent copies of his paintings.

 

His rigorous yet unfettered evolution is the subject of “Matisse: In Search of True Painting” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, one of the most thrillingly instructive exhibitions about this painter, or painting in general, that you may ever see. As ravishing as it is succinct, it skims across this French master’s long, productive career with a mere 49 paintings, but nearly all are stellar if not pivotal works.

 

Organized at the Met by Rebecca Rabinow, a curator of modern and contemporary art, this exhibition, which is in previews for members through Sunday and opens to nonmembers on Tuesday, sheds new light on Matisse’s penchant for copying and working in series. (It was seen in somewhat different versions at the Pompidou Center in Paris and the National Gallery of Denmark in Copenhagen.) To this end, the paintings proceed in pairs or groups aligned by subject: two still-life arrangements with fruit and compote, from 1899; two versions of a young sailor slouching in a chair, from 1906; four views (1900 to 1914) of Notre Dame seen from Matisse’s window across the Seine; three portraits (1916-17) of Laurette, a favorite dark-haired model, seen from various distances in a voluminous green robe from Morocco.

By Jim McKinniss

tPE member Kathy Shapiro to show at the Los Angeles Art Association

Posted in Photo Galleries, Photograph Exhibits, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by Jim McKinniss on December 1, 2012
Photo copyright by Kathy Shapiro.

Photo copyright by Kathy Shapiro.

On December 1, 2012, Los Angeles Art Association (LAAA) will present the 2012 Open Show, LAAA’s signature survey exhibition of the very best emerging contemporary art. The 2012 Open Show is juried by Rebecca Morse, Associate Curator, the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA).
Distinct by design, LAAA’s annual Open Show has developed into one of the most potent survey exhibitions of emerging art.

 

The opening reception is from 6 to 9pm on December 1, 2012 and runs through January 4, 2013 at LAAA’s Gallery 825.

 
Featured artists include:
Ted Andersen, Robert Boyd, Gary Frederick Brown, Ellen Cantor, Philippe Chambon, Charles Christopher, Joy
Curtis, Pam Dixon, Jeanne Dunn, Frances Elson, Jeanie Frias, Tina Frugoli, Josh Geyer, Matthew Miles Grayson,
Michael Griesgraber, Chong Hahn, Cindy Jackson, Caroline P.M. Jones, Motoko Kamada, Niku Kashef, Susan T.
Kurland, Sandra E. Lauterbach, Echo Lew, Heather J. Lowe, Matthew Marchand, Luigia Martelloni, Avery Mazor,
Crystal Michaelson, Rodney Millar, Tanya Nolan, Joanne Patterson, Karen Pendergrass, Osceola Refetoff, Alain
G. Roger, Joy J. Rotblatt, Larisa Safaryan, Samantha Senack, Cory Sewelson, Kathy B. Shapiro, Karen Sikie, Lisa
C. Soto, Fabrice Spies, Susan Swihant, Jane Szabo, Guillermo Valentin, Sasha vom Dorp, Jenny Wiener, Michael

Reception: 6-9pm, Saturday, December 1, 2012
Admission: Free
Location: Gallery 825 – 825 North La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles 90069
The 2012 Open Show runs through January 4, 2013.

For more information, visit http://www.laaa.org or call 310.652.8272.

 

By Jim McKinniss

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