The Photo Exchange

Ian Ruhter – Silver and Light at Fahey/Klein Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on October 12, 2014
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Los Angeles River copyright by Ian Ruhter

Levi Brown

Levi Brown copyright by Ian Ruhter

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Elsa copyright by Ian Ruhter

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Downtown Los Angeles copyright by Ian Ruhter

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Biker, Los Angeles copyright by Ian Ruhter

In the process of losing my way I have taken a tremendous journey back to the 1800′s.  
I have time-traveled the way you would in a dream. Taking me backwards into the future, a future where you paint with silver and light.
-Ian Ruhter

Ian Ruhter had been working as a successful commercial and sports photographer when he first discovered the wet plate collodion process.The nineteenth century photographic process involves pouring a liquid mixture of iodides, bromides, and a solution called collodion over a glass or aluminum plate. The plate is then bathed in silver nitrate, making it light-sensitive. The plate must then be quickly exposed and developed in just a few minutes, before the collodion dries and loses sensitivity. The process is expensive, laborious, and extremely unpredictable. Temperature and moisture affect the chemicals greatly and can entirely alter the developing process, ruining a wet plate. But the results of this labor intensive process are undeniable– a completely unique and incredibly detailed image, with rich layers of silver suspended in emulsion producing a three dimensional effect. Because the process is produced and controlled entirely by hand, each plate is inherently unique, with the chemicals’ process leaving irregular and impossible to reproduce beautiful ghostly shadows, halos, and ripples in each plate.

Ian Ruhter’s collodion wet plate landscapes honor the tradition of the pioneering California photographers who documented the incredible landscape of the Western United States. Ruhter has surpassed his predecessors in scope by creating a body of work documenting modern American cityscapes and contemporary portraits. Ruhter’s images combine the unrefined, antique wet plate aesthetic with contemporary subject matter. Ruhter respects the tradition pioneered before him by early photographers, while challenging himself to work on an even larger scale. Ruhter and his team have mastered making wet plates measuring up to 48 X 60 inches, the largest wet plates ever created to date, where in one will be the centerpiece of the exhibition.
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Artist Reception on October 16 from 7-9pm
This show runs October 16 to November 29, 2014
Fahey/Klein is located at 148 North La Brea, Los Angeles, CA 90036  
Phone: (323) 934-2250
By Jim McKinniss

Nancy Baron “The Good Life > Palm Springs” at dnj Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on October 3, 2014
Mighty Joe

Mighty Joe copyright by Nancy Baron.

Bob's Red Car

Bob’s Red Car copyright by Nancy Baron.

Thought of as ‘Paradise,’ Palm Springs is a vacation spot for much of southern California. It is located about 100 miles from Los Angeles. Palm Springs has this resort reputation, which has spread nation-wide, because of its attractions amidst the desert sun. Nancy Baron, on the contrary, highlights the community aspects of locals there, sharing the small town quality that exists. Baron does not glamorize Palm Springs; she is a part-time resident, and is able to rejoice in the everyday life of this place. As she states, “I aim to capture and celebrate the majesty in worlds that could easily be overlooked, seen as mundane, or otherwise misunderstood.” Her photographs, illuminating the use of saturated colors and a specific style of decoration, emphasizes her observations and the possibility of a path to ‘The Good Life.’

This is Nancy Baron’s first solo show with dnj Gallery. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally, with an emphasis here, in southern California. She lives and works in Los Angeles and Palm Springs. The Good Life > Palm Springs is now a monograph published by Kehrer Verlag. It is currently available in Europe and will be available in the U.S. and Canada this fall, 2014.

This show runs through November 1, 2014

dnj gallery
2525 Michigan Avenue, Suite J1, Santa Monica, California 90404
Phone: 310.315.3551
Email: office@dnjgallery.net

Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 10 am to 5 pm

By Jim McKinniss

Stephen Wilkes “Day to Night” at Peter Fetterman Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on September 28, 2014
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Eiffel Tower copyright by Stephen Wilkes.

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Rockefeller Center copyright by Stephen Wilkes

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Trafalgar Square copyright by Stephen Wilkes

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Santa Monica Pier copyright by Stephen Wilkes.

Day to Night is an ongoing global photography project that visually narrates the events and human activity of an entire day using a uniquely innovative photographic process. The images are created by photographing from one camera angle for up to 15 hours, continually observing and capturing thousands of specific moments throughout the day and night in some of the world’s most famed locations. While photographing, Wilkes is observing the view, watching for spontaneous events occurring in the scene and narrating a visual story as the hours goes by. A select group of these images are then painstakingly blendedinto one seamless photograph over several months, capturing the changing of time within a single frame.

Equal parts documentary street photography and architectural landscapes, the images in Day to Night appear aesthetically surreal while maintaining an honest representation of the cultural influence of people in their urban environments. Earlier works in the project show the day’s transition at iconic locations in Manhattan including Times Square, the Flat Iron Building, and Central Park. Wilkes says, “I discovered that the photographs began to highlight a form of emergent behavior within the daily life of the city. Studying the communication between pedestrians on sidewalks, cars and cabs on the street, these individual elements become complex life forms as they flow together.”

As Wilkes further developed and focused his process, later images such as Jerusalem (2012) and Presidential Inauguration, Washington D.C. (2013) include thousands of people shown in the position they were at during various times of day while maintaining a seamless transition of changing light. High-traffic scenes like in Santa Monica Pier (2013) and Union Square (2014) keep the viewer engaged with countless narratives of people embracing, playing sports, sun-bathing, or hailing a cab. New pieces debuting in the exhibition include Tunnel View, Yosemite (2014) and Eiffel Tower, Paris (2014) as well as works from New York City, Israel, and London.

Throughout the history of photography, there have been artists such as Eadweard Muybridge, Berenice Abbott, and Harold Edgerton, whose processes used technology to affect the possibilities of what a single image could convey. Stephen Wilkes is taking the concept of time and changing the way we look at a single still image, fusing hundreds of moments into one seamless scene, marking a new step in the ever-evolving medium of fine art photography. Beyond the narrative of light, Wilkes utilizes customized technology to achieve large-scale prints of breathtaking clarity and detail. The Day to Night series has een featured in TIME Magazine, The New York Daily News, CBS Sunday Morning, The Telegraph UK, and countless online blogs and publications. Stephen Wilkes (b. 1957) was educated at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. His photographs have been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world, and featured in numerous leading publications including The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, and Time, among many others. Awards and honors include the Adobe Breakthrough Photography Award, the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award for Magazine Photography, Photographer of the Year from Adweek Magazine, Fine Art Photographer of the Year 2004 Lucie Award, and the Epson Creativity Award. Wilkes’ work is in the permanent collection of the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Dow Jones collection, James A. Michener Art Museum, Snite Museum of Art, Jewish Museum of New York, Library of Congress and numerous private collections. Wilkes is based in Westport, CT. An opening reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, September 27, 2014 from 6:00-8:00pm.

Peter Fetterman Gallery
2525 Michigan Avenue Gallery A1
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Telephone: 310 453 6463

Hours: Wednesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm and by appointment.

General Inquiries: info@peterfetterman.com

By Jim McKinniss

A Legal Battle Over Vivian Maier’s Work

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on September 12, 2014

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All photos above are copyright by Vivian Maier.

The following text is the lead paragraph from a New York Times article on September 5, 2014

The story of the street photographer Vivian Maier has always been tangled — she worked much of her life as a nanny, keeping her artistic life a secret, and only after she died in 2009, at the age of 83, nearly penniless and with no family, were her pictures declared to be among the most remarkable of the 20th century. Now a court case in Chicago seeking to name a previously unknown heir is threatening to tie her legacy in knots and could prevent her work from being seen again for years.

To read the complete article follow this link:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/06/arts/design/a-legal-battle-over-vivian-maiers-work.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&bicmp=AD&bicmlukp=WT.mc_id&bicmst=1409232722000&bicmet=1419773522000&_r=0

By Jim McKinniss

Melanie Gaydos

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on September 3, 2014

Born with a condition called ectodermal dysplasia, Melanie Gaydos refuses to let her unconventional looks stop her from realizing her dream of becoming a high-fashion model.

To read more about Melanie follow the link below.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/02/03/model-melanie-gaydos-s-fight-for-high-fashion.html

This photo is copyrighted.

This photo is copyrighted.

 

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This photo is copyrighted.

This photo is copyrighted.

This photo is copyrighted.

  

 

By Jim McKinniss

tPE member John Montich at El Camino College Art Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by douglaspstockdale on August 18, 2014

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Myth And Image

John Montich, a long time member of the Photographers Exchange, will be exhibiting in a group show at the El Camino College Art Gallery (Torrance, CA).

The exhibition dates are August 25 thru September 18, 2014

Opening reception: September 4th, 7 – 9pm

Cheers!

tPE member Barbara Ruffini selected for Los Angeles Center of Photography

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 11, 2014

RUFFINI-All That We See Or Seem

All That We See or Seem copyright by Barbara Ruffini.

Long time member of The Photo Exchange, Barbara Ruffini, has had a photograph selected for the Grand Opening and Member’s Exhibition at Los Angeles Center of Photography.

According to Barbara:

The image is part of a greater on-going series of exploration I call, The Space Between
 
This image in particular is about looking. Looking, seeking, wondering, imagining, dreaming … what we see, what we think we see, what we hope to see, and what we dream. There is also an underlying note of whimsy, of course. After all, the mask, which blinds, has eyes painted upon it. (wink).
 

LACP is located at Hollywood at 1515 N. Wilcox Avenue, on the corner of Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood, CA

Opening date is Saturday, July 12, 7 – 11 pm

RSVP info@lacphoto.org 

 

By Jim McKinniss

NAN GOLDIN: EDEN AND AFTER

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 7, 2014

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Photo copyright by Nan Goldin

 

I subscribe to Lenscratch.com and so get its daily updates. I recommend the blog to everyone.

Here is the link to today’s post (July 7, 2014)

http://lenscratch.com/2014/07/nan-goldin-eden-and-after/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+lenscratch%2FZAbG+%28L++E++N++S++C++R++A++T++C++H%29

By Jim McKinniss

Brooks Jensen – Looking at Images

Posted in Books & Magazines, Photographers, Photography, tPE members by douglaspstockdale on July 7, 2014

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Copyright the photographers 2014 published by LensWork Publishing

I am very honored to announce that Brooks Jensen has selected one of images from the In Passing project that was published in the #74 edition of LensWork to include in his latest book Looking at Photographs.

Brooks Jensen is the Editor and Publisher of the LensWork journal and almost exclusively is focusing on Black and White photography. The bi-monthly journal is released concurrently in a print edition and a DVD that contains additional portfolios and audio interviews of the artist by Jensen.

He also publishes a series of blog posts that provide extensive homilies about a singular image from the LensWork journal portfolios, which Jensen has collected and becomes the source of this book. Jensen’s photographic essays are sequenced alphabetically as to the photographer work that he is discussing.

I have posted a expanded article about this book on The PhotoBook.

Cheers!

Douglas Stockdale

Looking_at_Images_Douglas_Stockdale-In_Passing

 

 

DANIEL WHEELER: GULP, (Generative Urban Landscape Project) 2005-2008 at Duncan Miller Gallery

Posted in Uncategorized by Jim McKinniss on July 4, 2014
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Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

 

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Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

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Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

 

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Photo copyright by Daniel Wheeler.

 

 

Duncan Miller Gallery is showing its second exhibition of Daniel Wheeler’s GULP series featuring large-format color landscapes of Southern California. Wheeler documents Los Angeles through the waters of a series of back yard swimming pools.

The artist statement regarding this project:

In this photographic project, the ubiquitous Southern California pool becomes a medium through which the surrounding landscape is interpreted. The peculiar garden that is urban Southern California would not exist without water. Here it is viewed through that chlorinated lens. Descending into water, my movement, and the exhalation of my breath, causes distortion of the surface. Pictures are made looking upward. The water is clear, but distorts; the landscape can be intuited but the perspective is indeterminate. The resulting cognitive dissonance forces viewers to sense, rather than read, the images. Verisimilitude has never been my goal: instead it is to provide a sensual springboard for interpretation. My work has addressed issues of self, place, and memory through an appeal to the viewer’s body, using sculptural forms and architecture to do so. This new project takes me back to photography, which was my first love as an artist.

Comprising over 50 large-scale images so far, as well as sculptures and performances in development, GULP represents a new direction for me, while developing directly from the work I have been doing for the past twenty-five years. In installations, drawings, performances and sculptures, I have used the Los Angeles landscape as muse and the body as basic element. In one precursor to GULP, I spent eight months drawing urban street trees on a daily basis, as a way of examining them, but also as a way of mapping my own state of mind.Comprising over 50 large-scale images so far, as well as sculptures and performances in development, GULP represents a new direction for me, while developing directly from the work I have been doing for the past twenty-five years. In installations, drawings, performances and sculptures, I have used the Los Angeles landscape as muse and the body as basic element. In one precursor to GULP, I spent eight months drawing urban street trees on a daily basis, as a way of examining them, but also as a way of mapping my own state of mind.

I found that the project (and the exhibition s effectiveness) benefited from the large number of drawings produced. Although each tree was unique, drawing over 175 of them in a uniform way allowed for reflection on the act of observation itself. The whole became a kind of accumulative phenomenological self-portrait , while situating itself specifically in this place, at this time.I found that the project (and the exhibition’s effectiveness) benefited from the large number of drawings produced. Although each tree was unique, drawing over 175 of them in a uniform way allowed for reflection on the act of observation itself. The whole became a kind of accumulative phenomenological self-portrait , while situating itself specifically in this place, at this time.

Using the sensual immediacy of large-scale photographic imagery I aim to cajole viewers out of their learned response to the environment into a more sensory experience of it, and back into their bodies, so to speak. The images are generated by an action, the descent under water. When viewers stand in front of the finished pictures, they find themselves inserted into the action and by extension into my presence there. The physical nature of the finished objects is therefore intimately connected to their effectiveness. The scale of the images (40 to 60  square), the intensity of the color, the reflective surfaces play crucial roles.

Duncan Miller Gallery is located at 2525 Michigan Avenue, Unit A7, Santa Monica, CA 90404

310 838 2440
info@duncanmillergallery.com

By Jim McKinniss

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